U.S. Supreme Court’s Epic Decision Validates Class Action Waivers

On May 21 the U.S. Supreme Court resolved the question whether the National Labor Relations Act prevents an employer from enforcing an employee’s contractual waiver of the right to sue the employer on a class or collective basis. In a 5-4 decision, the Court held that arbitration agreements requiring the processing of claims one-by-one and prohibiting class actions must be enforced, and neither the Federal Arbitration Act’s saving clause nor the National Labor Relations Act “permits this Court to declare the parties’ agreements unlawful.”  Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis; Ernst & Young v. Morris; NLRB v. Murphy Oil USA, Inc.

In each of these three cases, the employee signed a contract mandating the resolution of workplace disputes through arbitration on an individualized basis, and later brought collective action claims under the Fair Labor Standards Act for unpaid wages.  In seeking to void their class action waivers, the employees relied on the NLRB’s 2012 decision in D. R. Horton, Inc. and also argued that the FAA’s savings clause allowed the Court to deny enforcement of the arbitration agreements “upon such grounds as exist at law or in equity for the revocation of any contract.”

In the D. R. Horton case, the NLRB ruled that the NLRA effectively nullified the FAA in cases where an employer seeks to compel arbitration of employee claims on an individual basis only, by expanding the definition of “concerted activity” to include the right to bring a class or collective action. The NLRB ruled that an agreement not to bring a class or collective action is unenforceable as violative of the NLRA, even though waivers of other NLRA rights are enforceable.

The Court majority rejected the NLRB’s holding and held that the NLRA focuses on the rights to organize unions and bargain collectively. The Court commented that it “has never read a right to class actions into the NLRA – and for three quarters of a century neither did the [NLRB].” Justice Gorsuch, writing for the majority, reasoned that it is “pretty unlikely” that the NLRA was intended to protect the right to bring class or collective actions, especially since the NLRA makes no mention of them, and as recently as 2010 the NLRB’s General Counsel opined that the NLRA does not protect these rights.

The Court also relied on the FAA’s policy favoring arbitration agreements and legal precedent acknowledging the “unmistakably clear congressional purpose that the arbitration procedure, when selected by the parties to a contract, be speedy and not subject to delay and obstruction in the courts.” To hold all such provisions unenforceable, the Court stated, would cause arbitration to “wind up looking like the litigation it was meant to displace.”

This sweeping decision will likely eliminate some of the reservations and indecision that the employer community has had regarding including in their new employee orientation paperwork agreements requiring arbitration of employment-related claims on an individual basis only.

For more information regarding the value that mandatory arbitration agreements and class action waivers may add to your organization and how to design and roll out arbitration procedures that will survive legal challenge, please contact one of the Partners in the firm’s Labor Law Practice Group: James J. McGovern III, Esq., at jmcgovern@nullgenovaburns.com, Patrick W. McGovern, Esq., at pmcgovern@nullgenovaburns.com, Douglas E. Solomon, Esq. at dsolomon@nullgenovaburns.com, or John R. Vreeland, Esq., at jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com  — or call us at 973.533.0777.

Public Employer Obligations Under the Workplace Democracy Enhancement Act

Governor Murphy has signed the Workplace Democracy Enhancement Act (“WDEA”) into law. The WDEA takes immediate effect and creates new obligations of which public employers must be aware.

First, the WDEA extends the negotiations unit to include all full and part time employees who perform negotiation unit work. For example, employees who were not included in the unit because they had not met the threshold number of hours or percent of time worked, must be included in the unit within 90 calendar days from the law’s signing.

In addition, the WDEA requires public employers to provide “access” to organization members, and grants the exclusive representative employee organization specific rights, including, but not limited to:

  • The right to meet with members on the premises of a public employer during the workday to investigate and discuss grievances or other workplace related complaints, or to address any other workplace issue;
  • The right to conduct worksite meetings on the employer’s premises during lunch and other non-work breaks, as well as before and after the workday, in order to discuss workplace issues, collective negotiations, administration of a collective negotiation agreements, and other matters related to the organization’s duties and internal union matters;
  • The right for representatives to meet with new employees for a minimum of 30 minutes within 30 calendar days from that employee’s date of hire, without charge for such time against the employee’s pay or leave time;
  • The right to certain employee contact information, to be produced in a specific timeframe;
  • The right of email use, for matters such as collective negotiation agreements administration, the investigation of grievance, other workplace related complaints or concerns, and internal union matters; and
  • The right to demand negotiations over rights of access, subject to binding arbitration.

The WDEA furthermore prohibits public employers from encouraging employees to resign or relinquish membership in a union, and from encouraging them to revoke their authorization of fee deductions. Public employers likewise are prohibited from either encouraging or discouraging employees from joining, forming, or assisting a union. An employer who violates these provisions will be deemed to have engaged in an unfair labor practice, and the WDEA requires the Public Employment Relations Comission to order the employer to make the union whole for any harm that may result from such actions.

Finally, the WDEA amends existing law to provide that union fee deductions may be authorized by means of electronic communication and electronic signatures. In addition, employees of a public employer that have previously authorized deductions must give written notice to the employer “during the 10 days following each anniversary date of their employment” if they wish to revoke their authorization. Upon receipt of an employee’s revocation, the public employer is required to provide notice to the union within five days. The revocation takes effect on the 30th day after the anniversary date of employment.

For further information, please contact Joseph M. Hannon, Esq.,  or Jennifer Roselle, Esq., Counsel with the Labor Law Practice Group.

Welcome to The Garden State: NJ’s Law Against Discrimination Grows to Protect Non-Resident Employees

A New Jersey appellate court recently held that a non-resident employee who telecommuted to her New Jersey employer from her home in Massachusetts may be covered by the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (NJLAD).

Facts

The employer, Legal Cost Control, Inc. (LCC), was a corporation located in Haddonfield, New Jersey.  The employee, Susan Trevejo, lived in Massachusetts, paid property taxes in Massachusetts, and held a Massachusetts driver’s license.  She never lived in New Jersey, and she never worked in LCC’s New Jersey office.  Trevejo received health insurance benefits from LCC’s insurance provider, Amerihealth New Jersey, but the plan did not condition coverage on New Jersey residency.  Trevejo’s sole connection to New Jersey was using a company-issued computer to remotely connect to LCC’s network and a company-issued phone to engage in conference calls.  After twelve years with the company, LCC terminated Trevejo’s employment.  In turn, she filed a lawsuit alleging age discrimination in violation of the NJLAD.

Lower Court’s Decision

LCC moved to dismiss the case, arguing that Trevejo was not an “inhabitant” of New Jersey, and thus, could not pursue a claim under NJLAD.  The trial court allowed for limited discovery over whether Trevejo was an “inhabitant” of New Jersey; the parties were barred from engaging in discovery over Trevejo’s other connections to the state.  The trial court ultimately dismissed the case, finding that Trevejo was not an “inhabitant” of New Jersey covered by NJLAD.

Appellate Court’s Decision

Trevejo appealed, arguing that the trial court overly restricted discovery and that she needed to engage in discovery regarding the nature and substance of her daily “virtual” connection to LCC’s New Jersey office.  The Appellate Division agreed, reversing the trial court’s decision and sending the case back to the trial court for more discovery.

In deciding that NJLAD’s coverage is not limited to inhabitants of New Jersey, the Appellate Division relied on the text of NJLAD itself.  The statute expressly prohibits discrimination against “any individual” and repeatedly uses the term “person” to identify who is protected from discrimination.  The term “person” is used throughout the statute, whereas the word “inhabitant” appears only in the legislation’s preamble.  Accordingly, the court concluded that NJLAD’s coverage is not limited to inhabitants of New Jersey.  This was, as the Appellate Division reasoned, consistent with the overarching goal and strong public policy behind NJLAD, to eradicate discrimination from the workplace entirely.  The trial court’s restricting discovery to whether Trevejo was a New Jersey inhabitant could not be reconciled with that principle.

Rather than Trevejo’s place of residency, the Appellate Division directed that discovery focus on where the discriminatory conduct took place and whether Trevejo was employed in New Jersey or Massachusetts.  The scope of discovery should extend to:

  • Where plaintiff’s co-employees worked;
  • Whether those co-employees worked from home;
  • The nature of the software used by plaintiff and other LCC employees to conduct business on behalf of LCC;
  • The location of the server used to connect plaintiff and other employees to LCC’s office in New Jersey;
  • The location of the internet service provider allowing plaintiff and other employees to connect to LCC’s office in New Jersey;
  • The individual or individuals who made the decision to terminate plaintiff and the basis for the decision; and
  • Any other issues relevant to plaintiff’s contacts with New Jersey and her work for LLC that may demonstrate her entitlement to protection under the NJLAD.

Facts Matter

The New Jersey Appellate Division has consistently applied this type of fact-sensitive approach to deciding whether non-resident telecommuters are covered by New Jersey laws, even outside the discrimination context.  But this fact-sensitive approach often produces seemingly inconsistent results.  For example, in one case, an employee who telecommuted to her New Jersey employer from her home in North Carolina was denied New Jersey unemployment benefits based on a finding that she performed all of her work in North Carolina.  This seems to contradict the holding in Trevejo’s case, where the court was unconvinced by the fact that Trevejo performed all of her work in Massachusetts.  As if you were not already confused enough by the muddle of laws and regulations governing the workplace, this case illustrates the importance of facts, rather than bright line rules, in making decisions about your employees.

Bottom Line

Beware that all of your employees, regardless of where they perform their work, may be entitled to claim protection from discrimination under NJLAD.  The issue will come down to a factual inquiry over whether they have sufficient contacts with the state.  Be mindful that NJLAD is one of the most employee-protective state anti-discrimination statutes in the country.  In light of that fact, and the absence of any bright line rule regarding NJLAD’s applicability to out-of-state employees, you may want to consider executing, where available by law, a written agreement with your non-resident telecommuters delineating which state’s law applies in the event of a legal dispute (“choice of law” clause), and in which court those disputes are to be filed (“forum selection” clause).

For more information about the potential impacts of this ruling or what steps your company can take to effectively prevent and address complaints of discrimination, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

UPDATED: New Laws in New York State & City on Workplace Sexual Harassment

Governor Andrew Cuomo recently signed several new laws imposing requirements on employers in New York State regarding sexual harassment.  New York City employers will be subject to additional requirements, as Mayor Bill de Blasio just signed a package of bills, collectively called the “Stop Sexual Harassment in New York City Act.”.  New York State and City employers should prepare for these changes and their varying effective dates summarized below.

New York State

  • Employers Cannot Mandate Arbitration of Sexual Harassment Claims – Employers can no longer mandate that employees arbitrate sexual harassment claims unless that prohibition is inconsistent with (a) federal law or (b) a collective bargaining agreement. This provision is sure to be challenged based on preemption under the Federal Arbitration Act, however, unless or until a court rules otherwise, the law will be effective as of July 11, 2018.
  • Most Nondisclosure Agreements are Banned from Sexual Harassment Settlements Unless Sufficient Consent and Notice – Employers who settle sexual harassment claims can no longer include provisions in their settlement agreements preventing the disclosure of facts underlying the claims, unless the complaining party consents to it. He/she must be given 21 days to consider the nondisclosure language and 7 days thereafter to revoke it.  He/she cannot waive this right.  This law takes effect on July 11, 2018.
  • Employers Must Adopt a Policy and Provide Annual Training on Sexual Harassment – The state will establish a model sexual harassment policy and training program that will address specific topics, including information related to what laws workplace sexual harassment violates, remedies available to victims, complaint and investigation procedures, and the additional obligations imposed on supervisory employees to address sexual harassment. Effective October 9, 2018, employers will be required to adopt a policy that meets or exceeds the model policy’s standards, distribute that policy in writing to all of its employees, and implement an annual training program that meets or exceeds the model training program’s standards.  Effective January 1, 2019, most companies bidding for a state contract will be required to accompany their bids with a certification stating that they have a written policy and training program that meets or exceeds the models.
  • Employers Are Now Liable to Non-Employees for Sexual Harassment – Employers will be held liable for sexual harassment committed against contractors, subcontractors, vendors, and others providing services under a contract, where it can be shown that the employer (a) knew or should have known that such non-employee was being harassed but did nothing about it, and (b) has sufficient control and “legal responsibility” with respect to the conduct of the harasser. This law takes effect immediately.
  • Government Employees Must Refund any Taxpayer-Funded Payouts for Sexual Harassment Awards – Effective immediately, employees of the state, political subdivisions or other public entities (including elected officials), who have been found personally liable for sexual harassment in the workplace, must refund to the state/other public entity any payments it made to the plaintiff on that employee’s behalf, within 90 days.

New York City

  • NYC’s Anti-Harassment Statute Will Apply to All Employers – The NYC Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”), which governs harassment in the workplace, previously applied to employers with 4 or more employees. Effective immediately, the NYCHRL applies to all employers, regardless of size, with respect to liability for sexual harassment.
  • Sexual Harassment Claims Will be Subject to a Three-Year Statute of Limitations – In its prior form, the NYCHRL imposed a one-year statute of limitations on claims of discrimination and harassment. Effective immediately, that limitations period is extended to three years for claims of gender-based harassment.
  • NYC Employers Must Provide Annual Sexual Harassment Training – The City will establish a model sexual harassment training program designed to explain what sexual harassment is and what laws it violates, and inform employees about the complaint processes and legal remedies available to them, that retaliation is prohibited, and the heightened duties imposed on supervisory employees to address sexual harassment. Effective April 1, 2019, private City employers with 15 or more employees will be required to provide all employees annual sexual harassment training that meets or exceeds the model program’s standards.  New employees must receive the training within 90 days of hire.  The program must be interactive, but it need not be live.  Employers will be required to maintain records of trainings, including acknowledgement forms.
  • NYC Employers Must Hang a Poster & Distribute a Hand-Out Regarding Sexual Harassment – The City will create a poster and hand-out setting forth employees’ rights regarding workplace sexual harassment. Effective September 6, 2018, all employers will be required to mount the poster in a conspicuous place and distribute the handout to all employees.  The poster must be at least 8.5 by 14 inches in size, using at least 12-point font, and posted in both English and Spanish.

Employer To-Do List

The following is a non-exhaustive list of some action items that New York State and City employers are strongly encouraged to follow, in consultation with legal counsel:

  • Review and revise your existing policies, practices, procedures, and training programs, as well as employment contracts, severance agreements, and other contracts to ensure compliance with these new state and city laws.
  • Even if your existing harassment policies comply with the new laws, best practice suggests that you redistribute them.
  • Now that contractors and other non-employees are protected from sexual harassment, you should consider providing training to them if you have not done so already.
  • Do not blindly adopt the state and/or city’s model policies or training programs. These are designed to provide minimum thresholds that you should adjust and build upon based upon the needs of your company.

For more information on what your company can do to ensure compliance with the many new sexual harassment laws imposed on New York State and New York City employers, please contact Harris S. Freier, Esq., Partner in the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at hfreier@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Partner and Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

N.J. Governor Orders Fresh Focus On Worker Misclassification

On May 3, 2018 New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed Executive Order No. 25 which authorizes a 12-person task force to review misclassification of workers as independent contractors in New Jersey, with a focus on the construction industry.  The Employee Misclassification Task Force will be responsible for examining misclassification enforcement, developing practices to improve enforcement of current law, making recommendations to encourage compliance with the law, and reviewing existing state law and applicable procedures related to worker misclassification.

The reasons advanced by the Governor for launching the Task Force are that misclassification as an independent contractor results in workers’ losing legal rights and employment related benefits, harms the State’s economy by non-payment of State and federal payroll taxes, serves as a barrier to union organizing, and provides non-compliant employers with an unfair competitive advantage over employers that properly classify their workers.

The Task Force will include three representatives of the State Department of Labor and Workforce Development, three representatives of the Department of the Treasury, one representative each of the Departments of Law and Public Safety, Agriculture, Banking and Insurance, Human Services, and Transportation, and a representative of the Economic Development Authority. Notably, the Task Force will have no representation from the plaintiffs’ or defense bars, at least at the outset.

In light of the State’s renewed crackdown, employers must be cognizant that the designation of a worker as an independent contractor in New Jersey is not a matter of semantics but must be defensible under legal precedent. Specifically, New Jersey adheres to the “ABC” test in distinguishing an independent contractor from an employee. This test presumes that a worker is an employee of the service recipient and places the burden on the service recipient to establish otherwise.

To meet this burden, an employer must show that:

  • The worker has been and will continue to be free from control or direction of the performance of the service, both in the service contract and in fact;
  • The worker’s service is either outside the usual course of business for the service recipient, or is performed outside of all the places of the business of the service recipient; and
  • The worker is engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession or business.

If any of these three criteria is not met, the worker is properly classified as an employee.  Accordingly, a New Jersey employer must carefully assess the status of its workforce in light of the heightened attention to misclassification at the state level.

For more information about Executive Order No. 25 and guidance as to what your organization should be doing in anticipation of this new enforcement priority, please contact one of the partners in the firm’s Labor Law Practice GroupJames J. McGovern III, Esq., at jmcgovern@nullgenovaburns.com, Patrick W. McGovern, Esq., at pmcgovern@nullgenovaburns.com, Douglas E. Solomon, Esq. at dsolomon@nullgenovaburns.com, or John R. Vreeland, Esq., at jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com  — or call us at 973-533-0777.

New Jersey Passes Mandatory Paid Sick Leave

On May 2, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed a law mandating all private and public New Jersey employers, regardless of size, offer paid sick leave. This makes New Jersey the 10th state to adopt mandatory paid sick leave legislation. The Paid Sick Leave Act (“the Act”) also permits employees to use the leave for their own care or for the care of a family member and expands how paid sick leave can be used, encompassing protections beyond the federal Family Leave and Medical Act, the New Jersey Family Leave Act as well as other leave laws. The new law also fully pre-empts the 13 municipalities in New Jersey with local paid sick leave ordinances, allowing employers to adopt a state-wide uniform paid sick leave policy.

Coverage

Permissible use of sick leave includes the following:

(i) Diagnosis, care, treatment, recovery and/or preventive care for the employee’s own mental or physical illness or injury or the employee’s family member’s mental or physical illness or injury;

(ii) Absence due to a public health emergency declared by a public official that causes the closure of the employee’s workplace or the school or childcare facility of the employee’s child or requires the employee or an employee’s family member to seek care;

(iii) A necessary absence for medical, legal or other victim services because of domestic or sexual violence perpetrated on the employee or the employee’s family member; or

(iv) To attend a school-conferences, meetings, or any event requested or required by a child’s school administrator, teacher, or other professional staff member responsible for the child’s education, or to attend a meeting regarding a child’s health or disability.

The Act also broadly defines “family members” to include an employee’s child, spouse, domestic partner, civil union partner, parent (including adoptive, foster or step-parent, or legal guardian), sibling (including foster or adoptive siblings), grandparent or grandchild, and the parent, grandparent or sibling of the employee’s spouse, domestic partner or civil union partner. Notably, an employee has the opportunity to use their sick leave for the care of a non-related individual whose close association with the employee is the “equivalent” of a family relationship.

Exemptions & Employees Covered by a CBA

Per diem healthcare employees, construction workers subject to a collective bargaining agreement (CBA), and public employees who are provided with sick leave with full payment pursuant to any other law, rule or regulation are exempt from the new law. Non-construction employees covered by a CBA at the time the law goes into effect are also not effect, but will apply once the agreement expires. Further, employees and their representatives may waive the rights available under the law and address paid leave in collective bargaining.

Accrual of Paid Sick Leave

Under the new law, employees accrue 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked. Employees may accrue up to 40 hours of paid sick leave per benefit year.  Employers are also permitted to designate the “benefit year” as any 12-month period but may not modify it without notifying the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL).

Employees become eligible to use earned sick leave beginning on the 120th day after they are hired, and may use their earned sick leave as it is accrued. Employers are also permitted to offer, or “frontload” 40 hours of paid sick time or utilize a paid-time-off (“PTO”) policy as long as it provides equal or greater benefits and accrue benefits at an equal or greater rate than the benefits provided under the Act. There is no requirement to payout accrued and unused sick leave upon termination absent a company policy to the contrary.

Upon the mutual consent of the employee and employer, an employee may voluntarily choose to work additional hours or shifts during the same or following pay period, in lieu of hours or shifts missed, but shall not be required to work additional hours or shifts or use accrued earned sick leave. In addition, an employer may not require, as a condition of an employee’s using earned sick leave, that the employee search for or find a replacement worker to cover the hours during which the employee is using earned sick leave.

Notice

Employers are entitled to 7 days advance notice of “foreseeable” absences and can restrict employee’s use of “foreseeable” paid sick leave on certain dates.  Where the need is unforeseeable, an employer may only require notice “as soon as practicable,” if the employer has notified the employee of this requirement.  In addition, employers are only permitted to ask the employee for documentation to substantiate the sick leave if the employee is absent for 3 or more consecutive days.

Compliance

Employers will be required to maintain records documenting the hours worked and earned sick leave used by employees. Records must be maintained for 5 years and made available for inspection by the NJDOL. If an employee claims an employer violated the Act, and that employer that has failed to maintain adequate records, then there is a presumption that the employer failed to provide paid sick leave.

Employers must also post a notification and distribute a written notification alerting employees of their rights within 30 days of the notice being issued by the NJDOL and provide the notification to all new employees at the time of hiring.

Anti-Retaliation

Employers are prohibited from retaliating or discriminating against employees under the Act. The Act broadly defines retaliation to include not only retaliatory personnel action like suspension, demotion, or refusal to promote, but also includes threatening to report the immigrant status of an employee or family member of the employee. Employers are also prohibited from retaliating or discriminating against an employee who files a complaint with the commissioner or a court alleging the employer’s violation of the Act, or informs any other person of their rights under the Act.

There is a rebuttable presumption of unlawful retaliatory action whenever an employer takes adverse action against an employee within 90 days of when that employee opposes any violation of the Act, informs any person about the employer’s alleged violation of the Act, files a complaint alleging a violation of the Act, or cooperates in an investigation into an alleged violation of the Act.

Penalties

Any failure of an employer to make available or pay earned sick leave as required by the new law, or any other violation of the law, shall be regarded as a failure to meet the wage payment requirements of the New Jersey Wage and Hour Law.  Employers will also be subject to the penalties and remedies contained in the New Jersey Wage and Hour Law, including fines and possible imprisonment, reinstatement of a discharged employee to correct any discriminatory action and payment of all lost wages in full.

Bottom Line

The New Jersey Paid Sick Leave Act takes effect in 180 days, on October 29, 2018. Employers in New Jersey, in consultation with legal counsel, must review and revise existing policies, practices and procedures related to calculating employee’s sick leave to ensure compliance with the Act.  Human Resources and Benefits personnel should also be trained on the new paid sick leave law requirements and Managers should also receive updated training to ensure that internal recordkeeping processes are sufficient to keep track of time taken under the new law.

For more information about the potential impacts of the Paid Sick Leave Act or what steps your company can take to effectively ensure compliance with wage and hour laws, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

New Laws in New York State & City on Workplace Sexual Harassment

Governor Andrew Cuomo recently signed several new laws imposing requirements on employers in New York State regarding sexual harassment.  New York City employers will be subject to additional requirements, as the city council just passed a package of bills, collectively called the “Stop Sexual Harassment in New York City Act,” which Mayor Bill de Blasio is expected to sign.  New York State and City employers should prepare for these changes and their varying effective dates summarized below.

New York State

  • Employers Cannot Mandate Arbitration of Sexual Harassment Claims – Employers can no longer mandate that employees arbitrate sexual harassment claims unless that prohibition is inconsistent with (a) federal law or (b) a collective bargaining agreement. This provision is sure to be challenged based on preemption under the Federal Arbitration Act, however, unless or until a court rules otherwise, the law will be effective as of July 11, 2018.
  • Most Nondisclosure Agreements are Banned from Sexual Harassment Settlements Unless Sufficient Consent and Notice – Employers who settle sexual harassment claims can no longer include provisions in their settlement agreements preventing the disclosure of facts underlying the claims, unless the complaining party consents to it. He/she must be given 21 days to consider the nondisclosure language and 7 days thereafter to revoke it.  He/she cannot waive this right.  This law takes effect on July 11, 2018.
  • Employers Must Adopt a Policy and Provide Annual Training on Sexual Harassment – The state will establish a model sexual harassment policy and training program that will address specific topics, including information related to what laws workplace sexual harassment violates, remedies available to victims, complaint and investigation procedures, and the additional obligations imposed on supervisory employees to address sexual harassment. Effective October 9, 2018, employers will be required to adopt a policy that meets or exceeds the model policy’s standards, distribute that policy in writing to all of its employees, and implement an annual training program that meets or exceeds the model training program’s standards.  Effective January 1, 2019, most companies bidding for a state contract will be required to accompany their bids with a certification stating that they have a written policy and training program that meets or exceeds the models.
  • Employers Are Now Liable to Non-Employees for Sexual Harassment – Employers will be held liable for sexual harassment committed against contractors, subcontractors, vendors, and others providing services under a contract, where it can be shown that the employer (a) knew or should have known that such non-employee was being harassed but did nothing about it, and (b) has sufficient control and “legal responsibility” with respect to the conduct of the harasser. This law takes effect immediately.
  • Government Employees Must Refund any Taxpayer-Funded Payouts for Sexual Harassment Awards – Effective immediately, employees of the state, political subdivisions or other public entities (including elected officials), who have been found personally liable for sexual harassment in the workplace, must refund to the state/other public entity any payments it made to the plaintiff on that employee’s behalf, within 90 days.

New York City

  • NYC’s Anti-Harassment Statute Will Apply to All Employers – The NYC Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”), which governs harassment in the workplace, currently applies to employers with 4 or more employees. Effective immediately following Mayor de Blasio’s signature, the NYCHRL will apply to all employers, regardless of size, with respect to liability for sexual harassment.
  • Sexual Harassment Claims Will be Subject to a Three-Year Statute of Limitations – In its current form, the NYCHRL imposes a one-year statute of limitations on claims of discrimination and harassment. Effective immediately upon signature, that limitations period will be extended to three years for claims of gender-based harassment.
  • NYC Employers Must Provide Annual Sexual Harassment Training – The City will establish a model sexual harassment training program designed to explain what sexual harassment is and what laws it violates, and inform employees about the complaint processes and legal remedies available to them, that retaliation is prohibited, and the heightened duties imposed on supervisory employees to address sexual harassment. Effective April 1, 2019, private City employers with 15 or more employees will be required to provide all employees annual sexual harassment training that meets or exceeds the model program’s standards.  New employees must receive the training within 90 days of hire.  The program must be interactive, but it need not be live.  Employers will be required to maintain records of trainings, including acknowledgement forms.
  • NYC Employers Must Hang a Poster & Distribute a Hand-Out Regarding Sexual Harassment – The City will create a poster and hand-out setting forth employees’ rights regarding workplace sexual harassment. Effective 120 days after Mayor de Blasio’s signature, all employers will be required to mount the poster in a conspicuous place and distribute the handout to all employees.  The poster must be at least 8.5 by 14 inches in size, using at least 12-point font, and posted in both English and Spanish.

Employer To-Do List

The following is a non-exhaustive list of some action items that New York State and City employers are strongly encouraged to follow, in consultation with legal counsel:

  • Review and revise your existing policies, practices, procedures, and training programs, as well as employment contracts, severance agreements, and other contracts to ensure compliance with these new state and city laws.
  • Even if your existing harassment policies comply with the new laws, best practice suggests that you redistribute them.
  • Now that contractors and other non-employees are protected from sexual harassment, you should consider providing training to them if you have not done so already.
  • Do not blindly adopt the state and/or city’s model policies or training programs. These are designed to provide minimum thresholds that you should adjust and build upon based upon the needs of your company.

For more information on what your company can do to ensure compliance with the many new sexual harassment laws imposed on New York State and New York City employers, please contact Harris S. Freier, Esq. of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at hfreier@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

New Jersey Takes the Lead in Equal Pay Act Legislation

Following up on his January 16, 2018 Executive Order promoting equal pay for equal work, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed a historic and sweeping equal pay law on April 24, 2018. The “Diane B. Allen Equal Pay Act” was named after former Republican Senator Diane B. Allen, herself a victim of bias, who was part of the original negotiations surrounding the bill when it was first proposed under former Governor Chris Christie. The new Equal Pay Act applies to all employers in New Jersey regardless of size and is scheduled to take effect on July 1, 2018. The new law combats not only gender pay discrimination but also wage discrimination against those protected by the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (NJLAD).

Coverage

The Equal Pay Act amends the NJLAD and now makes it illegal for an employer to pay any employees who are members of a protected class recognized under the NJLAD at a lower compensation than other employees who are not members of a protected class, for “substantially similar work,” unless a pay differential is justified by legitimate business necessity. Under the NJLAD, protected classes include race, creed, sex, color, national origin, ancestry, nationality, disability, age, pregnancy or breastfeeding, marital, civil union or domestic partnership status, affectional or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, military status, and genetic information or atypical hereditary cellular or blood traits. “Substantially similar work” is determined by a combination of the “skill, effort and responsibility” required for that position and is not limited to employees who work within a specific geographic area or region.

Moreover, although the legislation carves out an exception for differential pay based on certain factors like merit, seniority, and education, this exception is only so long as these factors do not perpetuate a sex-based differential in compensation. For example, if one employee has a different title than another employee or even works in a different department, but both employees perform the same types of tasks with similar levels of responsibility, both employees should be paid the same.

An employer may pay a different rate of compensation only if the employer demonstrates that the differential is made pursuant to a seniority system, a merit system, or the employer demonstrates:

  • The differential is based on one or more legitimate, bona fide factors other than the characteristics of members of the protected class (like training, education, experience, or the quantity or quality of production);
  • The factors are not based on, and do not perpetuate, a differential in compensation based on sex or any other characteristic protected under the NJLAD;
  • Each of the factors must be applied reasonably;
  • One or more factors account for the entire wage differential; and
  • The factors are job-related with respect to the position in question and based on a legitimate business necessity.

Prohibitions

The new law also makes it easier for employees to win pay-discrimination cases since all they would need to show is that they were paid unequally for “substantially similar” work, rather than the previous standard of “substantially equal” work. Employers are also not permitted to reduce the rate of compensation of any employee in order to achieve compliance.

The new law also prohibits employers from retaliating against employees who (1) oppose any practices or acts forbidden under the Act; (2) seek legal advice regarding rights under the Act; (3) share relevant information with legal counsel or a governmental entity; or (4) file a complaint, testifies or assists in any proceeding.  The Act also forbids coercion, intimidation, threats or interference with any person in the exercise or enjoyment of, or on account of that person having aided or encouraged any other person in the exercise or enjoyment of, any right granted or protected by the Act.

Statute of Limitations

In addition to any other relief authorized by the NJLAD, liability under the new law shall accrue, and an aggrieved person may obtain relief for back pay, for up to 6 years, so long as the violations continue within the 6-year period. The law also makes it unlawful to require employees or prospective employees to consent to a shortened statute of limitations or to waive any of the protections afforded under the NJLAD.

Available Damages

In addition to the damages permitted under the NJLAD, the new law allows victims of discrimination to recover triple damages should a jury, or the New Jersey Division of Civil Rights, determine that the employer is guilty of an unlawful employment practice as defined by the law.

Reporting Obligations

To ensure companies doing business with the state comply, companies that win contracts from public agencies are required to submit reports to the Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development. These reports would need to include the gender and race of employees in every job title or pay band, and the total compensation for each category of employees.

Bottom Line

Employers should carefully analyze their existing pay practices to ensure compliance. Prior to July 1, 2018, employers must review the current job descriptions, employee handbooks and policies to determine which employees perform “substantially similar work” in order to ensure they are being compensated at the same rate. If, after doing this review, there is a pay differential, the employer must be able to show that the difference is not based on sex or any other characteristic of members of a protected class. Existing handbooks and policies must also be revised to prohibit pay discrimination for substantially similar work, and prohibit retaliation against employees who request, discuss or disclose compensation or other job-related information covered by the law. Human resources and benefits personnel should also be trained on the new requirements and managers should also receive updated training.

Employers must also be aware that the provision for back pay damages is much more extensive than federal law, and the possibility of treble damages should a jury find that an employer is guilty of an unlawful employment practice should serve as a powerful deterrent to correct discriminatory pay differentials.  Lastly, employers who work with public entities must ensure that payroll records and other information regarding the “gender, race, job title, occupational category and rate of compensation” of every employee that is part of the project is up to date and sent to the public entity.

For more information regarding the impacts of this legislation and how to implement nondiscriminatory pay practices, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Director of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com or 973-533-0777.

AG Requires New Jersey Police Departments To Randomly Drug Test Officers

The New Jersey Attorney General has issued new directive requiring all law enforcement agencies in the state to conduct random drug testing. The guidelines now make all officers subject to drug testing, whether they are employed by state, county, or municipal departments. At a minimum, random drug testing shall be conducted at least once for the remainder of 2018 and at least twice every year thereafter. At least 10% of the total number of sworn officers in an agency shall be drug tested every year.

Each agency must also notify officers of the implementation of the random drug testing policy. This includes notification that, upon an initial positive result, the officer shall be suspended from all duties. Upon final disciplinary action, the officer shall be terminated from employment as a law enforcement officer, reported to the Central Drug Registry maintained by the State Police, and permanently barred from future law enforcement employment in New Jersey.

The new guidelines also contain reporting requirements. Each department will be required to notify the County prosecutor within 10 days of (1) a positive drug test by an officer, (2) a refusal by an officer to take a drug test, or (3) administration of a reasonable suspicion drug test to an officer. Upon completion of any disciplinary action, each agency shall report the discipline to the County Prosecutor. By December 31 each year, each law enforcement agency shall provide written notice to the County prosecutor of the dates of testing conducted during the prior year, the total number of sworn officers employed by the agency, the total number of sworn officers tested, and the total number of sworn officers who tested positive.

By January 31 of each year, each County prosecutor will have to send the Attorney General a report including a statement indicating those agencies under the County Prosecutor’s supervision that are in compliance with this Directive and those that are not. Neither summary shall reveal any subject officer’s identity.

Law enforcement agencies are required to adopt or amend their random drug testing policies to meet these new requirements within 30 days of the March 20, 2018 directive. Aside from these minimum requirements, the drug testing procedures themselves are unchanged.

For more information regarding this directive and best practices for implementing appropriate drug testing policies and procedures, please contact Joseph M. Hannon, Esq. at jhannon@nullgenovaburns.com or Jennifer Roselle, Esq. at jroselle@nullgenovaburns.com, attorneys in the firm’s Labor Law Practice Group, or call 973-533-0777.

Second Circuit Issues Landmark Decision that Title VII Prohibits Sexual Orientation Discrimination

Overruling its own precedent, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit became the second federal appeals court to hold that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

Zarda v. Altitude Express, Inc., decided on February 26, 2018, arose from the claims of a Long Island sky-diving instructor, Donald Zarda.  Zarda was fired after revealing to a female client, whose boyfriend then revealed to Zarda’s boss, that Zarda was gay.  Zarda alleged that his termination was discriminatory on the basis of his sexual orientation and sex in violation of Title VII, whereas the company attributed it to his behavior.  Title VII expressly prohibits workplace discrimination “because of . . . sex.”  The Second Circuit had previously declined to recognize that sexual orientation is inherently a sex-based consideration and, thus, it held that sexual orientation discrimination claims were not cognizable under Title VII.  Applying that precedent, the federal trial court dismissed Zarda’s case on summary judgment, concluding that Zarda had failed to show he had been discriminated against on the basis of his sex and declining to recognize sexual orientation discrimination as a cognizable claim under Title VII.  Zarda appealed, and the Second Circuit affirmed.  Thereafter, the Second Circuit granted rehearing en banc, which is a mechanism allowing judges to rehear a case upon a majority vote.  This is significant because en banc review rarely happens and is often saved for cases that present a “question of exceptional importance.”

Years after the Second Circuit originally ruled that sexual orientation is not covered by Title VII, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Seventh Circuit oppositely held that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is a form of sex discrimination barred by Title VII.  Emphasizing the evolving nature of Title VII, the Second Circuit in Zarda overruled its prior caselaw to hold that Title VII prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation as discrimination “because of . . . sex.”

In dispensing with its prior rulings, the Second Circuit reasoned that sexual orientation is defined by one’s sex in relation to the sex of those to whom he/she is attracted.  Discriminating against an employee because he/she is homosexual means discriminating against him/her because of a) his/her sex, and b) his/her sexual attraction to those of the same sex.  Thus, “because sexual orientation is a function of sex and sex is a protected characteristic under Title VII, it follows that sexual orientation is also protected.”

The Second Circuit disagreed with the United States Justice Department, which argued in a friend-of-the court brief, that Title VII does not cover sexual orientation discrimination.

For now, the ruling that Title VII bars employers from discriminating based on sexual orientation applies to those in the Second Circuit, which includes New York, Connecticut, and Vermont.  However, this decision sharpens the divide among courts, setting the stage for a potential fight in the United States Supreme Court.  The Supreme Court could reverse the Second Circuit, or it could affirm, thereby extending Title VII’s prohibition on sexual orientation discrimination to the rest of the country.

For more information about the potential impacts of this Second Circuit ruling or what steps your company can take to effectively prevent and address complaints of sexual orientation discrimination, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.