NJLAD Amendment to Protect Nursing Mothers in the Workplace

Since 2010, the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) requires employers to provide reasonable break times for nursing mothers to express breast milk.  These break times must be provided for up to 1 year after the birth of the child.  On January 8, 2018, New Jersey’s Law Against Discrimination (“NJLAD”) was amended to include a similar requirement.  The NJLAD now requires all New Jersey employers to provide lactation breaks, regardless of the employer’s size and number of employees.

This new amendment to the NJLAD makes it a civil rights violation for an employer to terminate or discriminate against a female employee who breastfeeds or pumps milk on the job. The amendment also imposes a reasonable accommodation requirement, where employers must reasonably accommodate employees with daily break times and a suitable room or other location with privacy so that she can express breast milk for her child. This room must be in close proximity to the employee’s working area. However, it is not required that these breaks be paid, unless the employee is already compensated for breaks. While the FLSA requires that employers allow this accommodation for up to a year after the child’s birth, the new NJLAD amendment does not include any time restriction.

These requirements are effective immediately, unless the employer can demonstrate that providing the accommodation would pose an undue hardship on its operations. Factors to consider when deciding whether providing the accommodation would cause an undue hardship include: the number of employees, the number and type of facilities, the size of the budget, the nature and cost of the accommodation needed, and the extent to which the accommodation would involve waiver of an essential requirement of a job.

For more information about how these new requirements affect your company, please contact Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resource Training & Audit Programs Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

How to Avoid Disney’s Not-So-Fairy Tale $3.8 Million Payment of Employee Back Wages

On Friday, March 17, 2017, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) and two subsidiaries of The Walt Disney Co. (“Disney”), the Disney Vacation Club Management Corp., and the Walt Disney Parks and Resorts U.S. Inc., reached an agreement to resolve claims under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), requiring the payment of back wages of over $3.8 million to more than 16,000 employees of the two Florida-based Disney companies.

According to the DOL, Disney deducted a uniform (or “costume”) expense from employee pay, which lead some employees’ hourly rate to fall below the federal minimum wage rate of $7.25 per hour. The subsidiaries also did not compensate the employees for performing pre- and post-shift duties while additionally failing to maintain required time and payroll records.

As part of the agreement, Disney agreed to start training all Florida-based managers, supervisors, and non-exempt employees on what constitutes compensable worktime and emphasizing the need to record all records pertaining to time accurately.

There are certain steps that employers can do to avoid the significant damages Disney incurred including:

  • Maintain accurate payroll, time, and schedule related records. This is particularly important to our hospitality and restaurant clients where record keeping can be especially difficult.  Also, remember that under the FLSA, the records must be  maintained for a minimum of three years for payroll records and six years under New Jersey and New York law.
  • Deductions are an easy target for the plaintiffs’ bar. Employers must make sure that any deductions are legal under state law and that the deductions if permissible do not bring the affected employee below the state or federal minimum wage;
  • Perform a wage and hour self-audit every two years to avoid misclassification issues and to ensure your recordkeeping and pay practices are consistent with the law;
  • To avoid donning and duffing claims (claims involving changing into and out of uniforms, costumes, and protective equipment for example), employers must take care to distinguish between non-compensable time when changing into and out of the uniform is merely for the employees’ convenience as opposed to compensable time when the job cannot be accomplished without wearing the designated uniform or costume or safety equipment and it is impractical to arrive at work wearing same.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss best practices in complying with federal wage regulations, please contact John R. Vreeland, Esq., Partner & Chair of the  Wage and Hour Compliance Practice Group at jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com or call 973-533-0777 or Harris S. Freier, Esq., a Partner in the Employment Law and Appellate practice groups, at hfreier@nullgenovaburns.com, or call 973-533-0777.  Mr. Vreeland and Mr. Freier routinely work together in defending wage and hour class actions.  Please visit our free Labor & Employment Blog at www.labor-law-blog.com to stay up-to-date on the latest news and legal developments affecting your workforce.