Regulations Require Paid Sick Leave for Federal Contractors

On September 29, 2016, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued a final rule requiring federal contractors to provide employees with at least seven days of paid sick leave each year. This requirement applies to all new contracts.

What contracts must comply with the paid sick leave requirement?  Four types of contracts fall within the new sick leave requirement.  They are: 1) procurement contracts for construction covered by the Davis-Bacon Act; 2) service contracts covered by the Service Contract Act; 3) concession contracts; and 4) contracts in connection with Federal property or lands related to services for Federal employees and the general public.

What is a new contract?  The rule applies to new contracts, which is defined as a contract awarded or resulting from solicitations on or after January 1, 2017.  A contract prior to January 1, 2017 will also be considered a new contract if: 1) the contract is renewed; 2) the contract is extended, unless the extension arises from a term for a short term extension in the original contract; or 3) the contract is amended as a result of a modification outside the scope of the original contract.

How much paid sick leave must a federal contractor provide?  Employees working on covered, new contracts accrue one hour of paid sick leave for every thirty hours worked. Employers may also limit paid sick leave to 56 hours per year.  For administrative ease, an employer may “front-load” or provide the 56 hours at the beginning of the accrual year.  Special rules apply for carrying-over any unused paid sick leave to the following year.  The regulations also allow employers to implement a policy allowing forfeiture of any accrued, unused paid sick leave upon separation from employment.  However, if an employee is rehired within 12 months, the employer must reinstate accrued, unused paid sick leave.

What uses of paid sick leave are permitted?  The regulations provide that an employee may use paid sick leave for the following reasons:

  1. for the employee’s own physical or mental injury, injury, or condition
  2. for the employee to obtain diagnosis, care, or preventative care
  3. for the employee to care for a child, parent, spouse, domestic partner, or person in a family relationship for reasons relating to that person’s medical condition
  4. for reasons related to domestic violence, stalking, or sexual assault

For more information on the Final Rule and implementing best practices with these regulations, please contact Brigette N. Eagan, Esq., Counsel in the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group at beagan@nullgenovaburns.com or 973-533-0777.