AG Requires New Jersey Police Departments To Randomly Drug Test Officers

The New Jersey Attorney General has issued new directive requiring all law enforcement agencies in the state to conduct random drug testing. The guidelines now make all officers subject to drug testing, whether they are employed by state, county, or municipal departments. At a minimum, random drug testing shall be conducted at least once for the remainder of 2018 and at least twice every year thereafter. At least 10% of the total number of sworn officers in an agency shall be drug tested every year.

Each agency must also notify officers of the implementation of the random drug testing policy. This includes notification that, upon an initial positive result, the officer shall be suspended from all duties. Upon final disciplinary action, the officer shall be terminated from employment as a law enforcement officer, reported to the Central Drug Registry maintained by the State Police, and permanently barred from future law enforcement employment in New Jersey.

The new guidelines also contain reporting requirements. Each department will be required to notify the County prosecutor within 10 days of (1) a positive drug test by an officer, (2) a refusal by an officer to take a drug test, or (3) administration of a reasonable suspicion drug test to an officer. Upon completion of any disciplinary action, each agency shall report the discipline to the County Prosecutor. By December 31 each year, each law enforcement agency shall provide written notice to the County prosecutor of the dates of testing conducted during the prior year, the total number of sworn officers employed by the agency, the total number of sworn officers tested, and the total number of sworn officers who tested positive.

By January 31 of each year, each County prosecutor will have to send the Attorney General a report including a statement indicating those agencies under the County Prosecutor’s supervision that are in compliance with this Directive and those that are not. Neither summary shall reveal any subject officer’s identity.

Law enforcement agencies are required to adopt or amend their random drug testing policies to meet these new requirements within 30 days of the March 20, 2018 directive. Aside from these minimum requirements, the drug testing procedures themselves are unchanged.

For more information regarding this directive and best practices for implementing appropriate drug testing policies and procedures, please contact Joseph M. Hannon, Esq. at jhannon@nullgenovaburns.com or Jennifer Roselle, Esq. at jroselle@nullgenovaburns.com, attorneys in the firm’s Labor Law Practice Group, or call 973-533-0777.

Appellate Court Expands Rice Notice Requirements

Following the February 8, 2017 Appellate Division decision in Kean Federation of Teachers v. Morell, public bodies must review their processes for issuing Rice notices and making available meeting minutes to the public.

In its decision, the Appellate Division expanded the application of the Rice notice requirements to include all situations in which the public body intends to take action on an agenda item which will affect an employee’s “employment appointment, termination of employment, terms and conditions of employment, evaluation of the performance of, promotion or [discipline]” of its employees. This requirement attaches to all agenda items, regardless of whether the public body intends to hold a discussion about the matter.  The Court reasoned that presenting a Rice notice for all employees on a particular agenda allows the public body to have “flexibility to discuss matters in executive session when necessary and affords the affected employees the opportunity” to request a public discussion.

In the same decision, the Court also evaluated the timeframe required for a public body to release its meeting minutes so that it meets the OMPA’s requirement of making them “promptly available”.  At issue was a set of minutes from the September 15, 2014 meeting, which took 94 days to release.  A second set, from the December 6, 2014 meeting took 58 days to release.  Although the Court did not expressly define a timeline to comply with making minutes “promptly available,” it suggested that a reasonable timeframe for release is within 30-45 days.  Even without a clear rule, the Court makes it clear that a 2 or 3 month delay is not justifiable, and mandates public bodies to “adopt a protocol that makes the availability of its meeting minutes a priority.”

The Court’s clear directive to the parties is applicable to all public bodies effective immediately.  Public bodies should review their protocols to ensure that Rice notices be issued in advance of taking action on agenda items involving employment matters.  Public bodies must also review its processes to ensure an efficient method of producing required meeting minutes (including those which are subject to redaction) relatively soon after receipt of a request.

For additional guidance regarding compliance with the Court’s mandate, please contact Jennifer Roselle at 973-646-3324 or jroselle@nullgevnoaburns.com. Ms. Roselle is Counsel in the Firm’s Labor Law and Education Law Practice Groups.