U.S. Supreme Court’s Epic Decision Validates Class Action Waivers

On May 21 the U.S. Supreme Court resolved the question whether the National Labor Relations Act prevents an employer from enforcing an employee’s contractual waiver of the right to sue the employer on a class or collective basis. In a 5-4 decision, the Court held that arbitration agreements requiring the processing of claims one-by-one and prohibiting class actions must be enforced, and neither the Federal Arbitration Act’s saving clause nor the National Labor Relations Act “permits this Court to declare the parties’ agreements unlawful.”  Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis; Ernst & Young v. Morris; NLRB v. Murphy Oil USA, Inc.

In each of these three cases, the employee signed a contract mandating the resolution of workplace disputes through arbitration on an individualized basis, and later brought collective action claims under the Fair Labor Standards Act for unpaid wages.  In seeking to void their class action waivers, the employees relied on the NLRB’s 2012 decision in D. R. Horton, Inc. and also argued that the FAA’s savings clause allowed the Court to deny enforcement of the arbitration agreements “upon such grounds as exist at law or in equity for the revocation of any contract.”

In the D. R. Horton case, the NLRB ruled that the NLRA effectively nullified the FAA in cases where an employer seeks to compel arbitration of employee claims on an individual basis only, by expanding the definition of “concerted activity” to include the right to bring a class or collective action. The NLRB ruled that an agreement not to bring a class or collective action is unenforceable as violative of the NLRA, even though waivers of other NLRA rights are enforceable.

The Court majority rejected the NLRB’s holding and held that the NLRA focuses on the rights to organize unions and bargain collectively. The Court commented that it “has never read a right to class actions into the NLRA – and for three quarters of a century neither did the [NLRB].” Justice Gorsuch, writing for the majority, reasoned that it is “pretty unlikely” that the NLRA was intended to protect the right to bring class or collective actions, especially since the NLRA makes no mention of them, and as recently as 2010 the NLRB’s General Counsel opined that the NLRA does not protect these rights.

The Court also relied on the FAA’s policy favoring arbitration agreements and legal precedent acknowledging the “unmistakably clear congressional purpose that the arbitration procedure, when selected by the parties to a contract, be speedy and not subject to delay and obstruction in the courts.” To hold all such provisions unenforceable, the Court stated, would cause arbitration to “wind up looking like the litigation it was meant to displace.”

This sweeping decision will likely eliminate some of the reservations and indecision that the employer community has had regarding including in their new employee orientation paperwork agreements requiring arbitration of employment-related claims on an individual basis only.

For more information regarding the value that mandatory arbitration agreements and class action waivers may add to your organization and how to design and roll out arbitration procedures that will survive legal challenge, please contact one of the Partners in the firm’s Labor Law Practice Group: James J. McGovern III, Esq., at jmcgovern@nullgenovaburns.com, Patrick W. McGovern, Esq., at pmcgovern@nullgenovaburns.com, Douglas E. Solomon, Esq. at dsolomon@nullgenovaburns.com, or John R. Vreeland, Esq., at jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com  — or call us at 973.533.0777.

N.J. Governor Orders Fresh Focus On Worker Misclassification

On May 3, 2018 New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed Executive Order No. 25 which authorizes a 12-person task force to review misclassification of workers as independent contractors in New Jersey, with a focus on the construction industry.  The Employee Misclassification Task Force will be responsible for examining misclassification enforcement, developing practices to improve enforcement of current law, making recommendations to encourage compliance with the law, and reviewing existing state law and applicable procedures related to worker misclassification.

The reasons advanced by the Governor for launching the Task Force are that misclassification as an independent contractor results in workers’ losing legal rights and employment related benefits, harms the State’s economy by non-payment of State and federal payroll taxes, serves as a barrier to union organizing, and provides non-compliant employers with an unfair competitive advantage over employers that properly classify their workers.

The Task Force will include three representatives of the State Department of Labor and Workforce Development, three representatives of the Department of the Treasury, one representative each of the Departments of Law and Public Safety, Agriculture, Banking and Insurance, Human Services, and Transportation, and a representative of the Economic Development Authority. Notably, the Task Force will have no representation from the plaintiffs’ or defense bars, at least at the outset.

In light of the State’s renewed crackdown, employers must be cognizant that the designation of a worker as an independent contractor in New Jersey is not a matter of semantics but must be defensible under legal precedent. Specifically, New Jersey adheres to the “ABC” test in distinguishing an independent contractor from an employee. This test presumes that a worker is an employee of the service recipient and places the burden on the service recipient to establish otherwise.

To meet this burden, an employer must show that:

  • The worker has been and will continue to be free from control or direction of the performance of the service, both in the service contract and in fact;
  • The worker’s service is either outside the usual course of business for the service recipient, or is performed outside of all the places of the business of the service recipient; and
  • The worker is engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession or business.

If any of these three criteria is not met, the worker is properly classified as an employee.  Accordingly, a New Jersey employer must carefully assess the status of its workforce in light of the heightened attention to misclassification at the state level.

For more information about Executive Order No. 25 and guidance as to what your organization should be doing in anticipation of this new enforcement priority, please contact one of the partners in the firm’s Labor Law Practice GroupJames J. McGovern III, Esq., at jmcgovern@nullgenovaburns.com, Patrick W. McGovern, Esq., at pmcgovern@nullgenovaburns.com, Douglas E. Solomon, Esq. at dsolomon@nullgenovaburns.com, or John R. Vreeland, Esq., at jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com  — or call us at 973-533-0777.

Republican Majority at NLRB Brings Important Pro-Employer Decisions

The recent, temporary Republican majority at the NLRB brought several important changes to Board decisions issued during the Obama Administration. In early December Republican appointees of President Trump briefly held a majority of the seats on the Board. This status continued until December 16 when Board Chairman Miscimarra’s resignation took effect. However, in the weeks leading up to Miscimarra’s resignation, the three Republican Board members penned pro-employer decisions that for the most part return to Board precedent in effect prior to 2009. On December 22, 2017, President Trump appointed Board Member Marvin E. Kaplan as Acting Board Chairman. The President is expected to nominate management labor attorney John Ring to fill the vacancy created by Miscimarra’s resignation. But before Miscimarra exited, the Republican-majority issued several decisions that rolled back prior Board precedent and set the stage for more pro-employer decisions. A few examples are as follows.

On December 14, the Board issued two decisions, Boeing Co. and Hy-Brand Industrial Contractors, that address facially neutral workplace rules and the joint employer standard.  In Boeing, the Board revisited the 13-year old Lutheran Heritage standard which held that an employer that maintains a facially neutral workplace rule commits an unfair labor practice if an employee would reasonably construe the rule as prohibiting Section 7 activity. In Boeing, the company issued a workplace rule that prohibited cameras at work. The Board held that the Lutheran Heritage standard, under which the anti-camera rule was unlawful, failed to consider legitimate justifications for the polices, rules, and handbook provisions challenged. The Board found it particularly problematic that prior decisions applying the Lutheran Heritage standard found unlawful employer directives that employees “work harmoniously” and conduct themselves in a “positive and professional manner.”  In Boeing the Board announced it will now apply a two-pronged test that considers (i) the nature and extent of the rule’s potential impact on employee Section 7 rights and (ii) the employer’s legitimate justifications for the rule.

Also on December 14 the Board overruled the joint employer standard announced in its 2015 Browning-Ferris decision, which decreed that “even when two entities have never exercised joint control over essential terms and conditions of employment, and even when any joint control is not ‘direct and immediate,’ the two entities will still be joint employers based on the mere existence of ‘reserved’ joint control, or based on indirect control or control that is ‘limited and routine.’” In Hy-Brand Industrial Contractors, the Board held that a finding of joint employer status now requires proof that putative joint employers have actually exercised control over essential employment terms, and that the control is direct and immediate, not limited or routine.

On December 15, Miscimarra’s last day on the job, the NLRB issued two more pro-employer decisions — Raytheon Network Centric Systems and PCC Structurals, Inc.  In Raytheon, the Board revisited the Supreme Court’s 1962 decision in NLRB v. Katz and the case law applying Katz. The Court in Katz held that Section 8(a)(5) of the Act prohibits employers from making a change in mandatory bargaining subjects unless the employer gives the union advance notice and an opportunity to bargain over the proposed change. Later NLRB case law held that an employer may lawfully take unilateral action so long as it “does not alter the status quo.”  Raytheon provided an opportunity for the Board to clarify what constitutes a “change” from the “status quo” and to revisit the Board’s 2016 holding in E.I. du Pont de Nemours which re-defined what constitutes a “change” requiring notice to the union and bargaining prior to implementation. In DuPont the Board ruled that even if an employer continued to do precisely what it did for decades pursuant to a CBA, and even if the CBA permitted the employer’s past actions, once the CBA expires, taking the same action constitutes a “change.” Furthermore, if the employer’s action involved discretion and the employer took discretionary action, under DuPont this exercise of discretion was a “change.” In Raytheon the Board overruled DuPont as fundamentally flawed. The Board concluded that “an employer’s past practice constitutes a term and condition of employment that permits the employer to take actions unilaterally that do not materially vary in kind or degree from what has been customary in the past.” In Raytheon the Board held that since the employer routinely changed its employees’ benefits, premiums, deductibles, and copayments for health insurance in the past, Raytheon did not violate the Act when it made similar changes after the CBA expired. The Board held that its decision applied retroactively, but also cautioned this its holding had no effect on a union’s right to demand bargaining over mandatory bargaining issues.

On December 15 the Board returned to the prior standard for determining when a proposed unit is appropriate for collective bargaining. PCC Structurals Inc. The Board overruled its 2011 decision in Specialty Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center of Mobile and returned to its prior “community of interests” standard. The Board criticized the Specialty Healthcare standard for transferring too much responsibility from the Board to the organizing parties and deferring to the petitioned-for unit in all but a few narrow, highly unusual circumstances. In reverting to the community of interests standard, the Board stated, “It is the Board’s responsibility to determine unit appropriateness based on a careful examination of the community of interests of employees both within and outside the proposed unit.” Accordingly, employers will have greater participation in the determination of an appropriate unit for a union election. Conversely, union organizers are expected to have less success in gerrymandering the unit to conform to the employee groups they are targeting.

More pro-management changes are expected once the fifth Board member is confirmed. For example, the Board may revisit its blocking charge policy, which delays a union decertification election when a union files an unfair labor practice charge and essentially keeps the employees in the union until the election occurs, regardless of the charge’s merits.

For more information about how the changes at the NLRB affect unionization efforts at your company or your company’s implementation of work rules, policies or procedures, please contact one of the partners in the firm’s Labor Law Practice Group — James J. McGovern III, Esq., at jmcgovern@nullgenovaburns.com, Patrick W. McGovern, Esq., at pmcgovern@nullgenovaburns.com, Douglas E. Solomon, Esq. at dsolomon@nullgenovaburns.com, or John R. Vreeland, Esq., at jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com  — or call us at 973-533-0777.

Mr. Martinez (Maybe) Goes to Washington: NJ Chief Administrator to be Appointed by President Trump

Raymond Martinez, the current Chair and Chief Administrator of the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission (“MVC”), is to be appointed by President Trump as the next Administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (“FMCSA”). The FMCSA is a separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation and is tasked primarily with ensuring safety in motor carrier operations through strong safety regulation enforcement.

Mr. Martinez has served under Governor Christie since 2010. In his role as Chief Administrator, Mr. Martinez directs 2,400 employees at 71 MVC locations across New Jersey. He also serves as Chairman of the Motor Vehicle Commission Board, a policy-making body comprised of government and public members. Governor Christie appointed Mr. Martinez as an Executive Branch Member of the State Planning Commission, where he is called upon to represent state government in the oversight of environmental protection issues, land use, development and redevelopment.  In 2015, Mr. Martinez was selected by the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (“AAMVA”) to serve as a member of its International Board of Directors.

Mr. Martinez has been active in the public arena for more than twenty years. From 2005 to 2009, he served as the Deputy U.S. Chief of Protocol and Diplomatic Affairs for the U.S. Department of State, and the White House under President George W. Bush. As such, Mr. Martinez was responsible for managing five operational divisions: Diplomatic Affairs, Foreign Visits, Ceremonial Events, Blair House, and Administration. Between 2000 and 2005, Mr. Martinez served as the Commissioner for the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles as well as Assistant General Counsel for the Long Island Power Authority. During President Reagan’s administration, he served as Deputy Director for Scheduling and Advance for First Lady Nancy Reagan. He also held roles in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, within the New York State Senate, and as a private attorney.

For questions about employment issues involving the trucking and logistics industries, please contact John Vreeland, Esq., Chair of the Transportation, Trucking & Logistics Group and Partner in the Labor Law Practice Group at jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com or (973) 535-7118. Please also sign-up for our free Labor & Employment Law Blog at www.labor-law-blog.com to keep up-to-date on the latest news and legal developments effecting your workforce.

NYC Fast Food Employers Beware – Strict “Fair Workweek” Laws Are Coming December 1st

On May 30, 2017, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signed a bill enacting four laws, together called the Fair Workweek legislation package, aimed at creating more predictable work schedules for NYC’s fast food workers.  The laws go into effect on December 1, 2017.

The first law requires that the fast food employer provide written notice to the fast food employee of the employee’s work schedule, including regular and on-call shifts, 14 days before the worker’s first day of the new schedule.  The written notice must be posted in a conspicuous place at the workplace that is readily accessible and visible to all employees and transmitted to each employee, including via e-mail, if e-mail is regularly used to communicate scheduling information. Modification to the employee’s work schedule within 14 days of the first day the schedule begins will result in employer penalties ranging from $10 to $75 depending on the nature and timing of the modification. The penalty is paid directly to the affected employee.

The second law mandates a minimum amount of time between a fast food worker’s shifts.  A fast food employer will no longer be permitted to schedule a worker for two shifts with fewer than 11 hours between the end of the first shift and the beginning of the second shift when the first shift ends the prior calendar day or spans two calendar days. However, the worker may request or consent in writing to working back-to-back shifts with fewer than 11 hours between. Absent such request or consent, the employer will be subject to a $100 penalty each time the employee works such back-to-back shifts.

The third law prohibits the fast food employer from hiring new employees, including subcontractors, to work regular or on-call shifts before exhausting its current workforce. Under the new law, when shifts become available, the fast food employer must post a notice in a conspicuous and accessible location for at least three calendar days, and transmit the notice directly to each employee that states, among other things, the number of shifts offered, the schedule of the shifts, whether the shifts will occur at the same time each week, the length of time required for coverage, and the number of workers required for coverage. Assuming these conditions are met, the employer may look to outside employment only if none of the current fast food employees accept the open shift.

Finally, the fourth law allows a fast food employee to authorize the employer to deduct voluntary contributions from the employee’s paycheck and to remit the payment directly to the employee’s designated non-profit organization. The deduction must be at least $6.00 and only once per pay period.

New York City follows San Francisco and Seattle as the third major city to enact Fair Work Week legislation. To understand how the Fair Workweek legislation package affects your fast food business and your employees, please contact Nicole L. Leitner, Esq., a member of the Wage & Hour Compliance Practice Group, at (973) 387-7897 or nleitner@nullnullgenovaburns.com, or John Vreeland, Esq., Chair of the Wage & Hour Compliance Practice Group and a Partner in the Labor Law Practice Group, at (973) 535-7118 or jvreeland@nullnullgenovaburns.com.

The D.C. Circuit Vacates NLRB Ruling on Driver Status in FedEx Case

In early March 2017, the D.C. Circuit in FedEx Home Delivery v. NLRB, 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 3826 (D.C. Cir. 2017) vacated a National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “the Board”) ruling that Connecticut FedEx drivers constitute employees under the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”). The D.C. court said that the case was indistinguishable from a 2009 case before the panel involving a group of Massachusetts drivers.

In 2007, single-route FedEx drivers based in Hartford, CT elected Teamsters Local 671 (“Union”) to represent them which lead to FedEx filing subsequent objections to the NLRB. While the appeal was pending, the D.C. Circuit decided FedEx Home Delivery v. NLRB (FedEx I), 563 F.3d 492 (D.C. Cir. 2009), finding that FedEx drivers based out of the company’s Wilmington, MA terminal constituted independent contractors under the NLRA. In its holding, the court vacated the NLRB’s order to engage with the union and denied the Board’s cross-motion for enforcement. The court held that the NLRB was bound to apply the common-law ten factor agency test as set forth in the Restatement (Second of Agency), but explained that rather than a control inquiry, that the emphasis of these factors should be on  “entrepreneurial opportunity” for gain or for loss as it relates to the determination of a worker’s status.  FedEx identified three specific entrepreneurial opportunities available to the drivers: (1) drivers’ ability to hire other drivers; (2) drivers’ ability to sell routes; and (3) drivers’ ability to operate multiple routes.  Persuaded by these arguments, the court held that the FedEx drivers were independent contractors.

In 2014, the NLRB issued a revised decision in FedEx Home Delivery, 361 N.L.R.B. No. 55 (Sept. 30, 2014) which found that the facts pertaining to the Hartford drivers and those discussed in FedEx I were “virtually identical.” Still, however, the NLRB declined to adopt the D.C. Circuit’s 2009 interpretation of the NLRA because it disagreed with the court’s emphasis on “entrepreneurial opportunity” as the key factor in determining a worker’s status. Specifically, it said that the Board should give weight to actual, not merely theoretical, entrepreneurial opportunity, and it should evaluate the constraints imposed by a company on the individual’s ability to pursue that opportunity. Moreover, it noted that FedEx unilaterally drafts, promulgates, and changes the terms of its agreements with drivers, a feature that weighs “heavily in favor of employee status” along with the Board’s view that the drivers lacked independence and were disallowed the initiative and decision-making authority normally associated with an independent contractor   The Board also found that FedEx engaged in unfair labor practices affecting commerce under the NLRA by refusing to recognize and bargain with the union.

In the present case, FedEx argued that the question had already been argued before the D.C. Circuit in FedEx I and involved the same parties, thus the same result should follow. The court agreed and denied the Board’s cross-application for enforcement, granted FedEx’s petitions for review, and vacated the Board’s orders. The D.C. Circuit noted that in FedEx I, the Board considered all common-law factors and was still persuaded that the drivers were independent contractors. The court also noted that the U.S. Supreme Court previously held that that the question whether a worker is an “employee” or “independent contractor” under the NLRA is a question of “pure” common-law agency principles that a court can review and does not require special administrative expertise.

The takeaway for employers is that in determining whether workers are employees or independent contractors, employers must remember that despite significant overlap, there are in fact different tests as related to the NLRA, federal taxes, the Fair Labor Standards Act, state wage and hour law, ERISA, the Affordable Care Act, and various other circumstances.  While the D.C. Circuit has for the moment clarified (or rather reinforced) its view as to the proper test under the NLRA, employers should always focus on where their greatest liability is and attempt to cater to the relevant test as much as possible.

For questions about independent contractors or trucking and logistics, please contact John Vreeland, Esq., Chair of the Transportation, Trucking & Logistics Group and a Partner in the Labor Law Practice Group at jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com or (973) 535-7118, or, Harris S. Freier, Esq., a Partner in the Firm’s Employment Law and Appellate Practice Groups, at hfreier@nullgenovaburns.com or (973) 533-0777. Please also sign-up our free Labor & Employment Blog at www.labor-law-blog.com to keep up-to-date on the latest news and legal developments effecting your workforce.

How to Avoid Disney’s Not-So-Fairy Tale $3.8 Million Payment of Employee Back Wages

On Friday, March 17, 2017, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) and two subsidiaries of The Walt Disney Co. (“Disney”), the Disney Vacation Club Management Corp., and the Walt Disney Parks and Resorts U.S. Inc., reached an agreement to resolve claims under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), requiring the payment of back wages of over $3.8 million to more than 16,000 employees of the two Florida-based Disney companies.

According to the DOL, Disney deducted a uniform (or “costume”) expense from employee pay, which lead some employees’ hourly rate to fall below the federal minimum wage rate of $7.25 per hour. The subsidiaries also did not compensate the employees for performing pre- and post-shift duties while additionally failing to maintain required time and payroll records.

As part of the agreement, Disney agreed to start training all Florida-based managers, supervisors, and non-exempt employees on what constitutes compensable worktime and emphasizing the need to record all records pertaining to time accurately.

There are certain steps that employers can do to avoid the significant damages Disney incurred including:

  • Maintain accurate payroll, time, and schedule related records. This is particularly important to our hospitality and restaurant clients where record keeping can be especially difficult.  Also, remember that under the FLSA, the records must be  maintained for a minimum of three years for payroll records and six years under New Jersey and New York law.
  • Deductions are an easy target for the plaintiffs’ bar. Employers must make sure that any deductions are legal under state law and that the deductions if permissible do not bring the affected employee below the state or federal minimum wage;
  • Perform a wage and hour self-audit every two years to avoid misclassification issues and to ensure your recordkeeping and pay practices are consistent with the law;
  • To avoid donning and duffing claims (claims involving changing into and out of uniforms, costumes, and protective equipment for example), employers must take care to distinguish between non-compensable time when changing into and out of the uniform is merely for the employees’ convenience as opposed to compensable time when the job cannot be accomplished without wearing the designated uniform or costume or safety equipment and it is impractical to arrive at work wearing same.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss best practices in complying with federal wage regulations, please contact John R. Vreeland, Esq., Partner & Chair of the  Wage and Hour Compliance Practice Group at jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com or call 973-533-0777 or Harris S. Freier, Esq., a Partner in the Employment Law and Appellate practice groups, at hfreier@nullgenovaburns.com, or call 973-533-0777.  Mr. Vreeland and Mr. Freier routinely work together in defending wage and hour class actions.  Please visit our free Labor & Employment Blog at www.labor-law-blog.com to stay up-to-date on the latest news and legal developments affecting your workforce.

New York State Launches Aggressive Campaign to Enforce The New Minimum Wage Law

On December 31, 2016, the new minimum wage law in New York State took effect.  New York’s minimum wage law is among the most complicated in the country. The minimum wage will gradually increase to $15.00 in the coming years, with annual increases to take effect on December 31st. However, how quickly the minimum wage reaches $15.00 depends on where your company is located, the type of business you are in, and whether you are a small or a large employer. For example, the minimum wage in NYC will increase as follows:

New York City 10 or fewer employees 11 or more employees
December 31, 2016 $10.50 $11.00
December 31, 2017 $12.00 $13.00
December 31, 2018 $13.50 $15.00
December 31, 2019 $15.00

For Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester counties, the increments began December 31, 2016 and will conclude on December 31, 2021, with the following increases annually on December 31 no matter the size of the workforce: $10.00, $11.00, $12.00, $13.00, $14.00 and $15.00.  For the rest of New York State, the increments began December 31, 2016 and will conclude on December 31, 2020, with the following increases annually on December 31 no matter the size of the workforce: $9.70, $10.40, $11.10, $11.80, $12.50 and $15.00.

There is a special carve out for fast food companies.  By December 31, 2018, fast food companies in NYC will reach the $15.00 and by July 1, 2021 the rest of NY State’s fast food companies will reach $15.00.

The New York Department of Labor (NYDOL) plans to aggressively enforce the new law and has created a 200-investigator unit to ensure employers are appropriately increasing employee pay to at least the minimum wage. The newly formed State Minimum Wage Enforcement and Outreach Unit’s mission is to inform workers of the new minimum wage law and to ensure they are properly paid.  The State has also established a hotline for workers to report violations of the new minimum wage law. Hotline calls will initiate a NYDOL compliance audit.  If violations are found, a company is subject to a $3.00 fine for each hour the company failed to pay the required minimum wage to an employee plus back wages and liquidated damages.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss the new NYS minimum wage law and its effect on your business, please contact John Vreeland, Esq., Chair of the Wage & Hour Compliance Practice Group and a Partner in the Labor Law Practice Group at (973) 535-7118 or jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com, or Nicole L. Leitner, Esq., a member of the Wage & Hour Compliance and Labor Law Practice Groups at (973) 387-7897 or nleitner@nullgenovaburns.com.

NYC Joins the Pre-Trump Push for Employee Work Schedule Protections

New York City has joined several other cities, including San Francisco and Seattle, introducing legislation that offers more predictable, stable work schedules for employees in low-wage occupations. The legislation generally offers employees more notice of schedules, more access to extra hours, additional pay for last-minute schedule changes, and a mandated period of rest between certain back-to-back shifts. If passed, the legislation would take effect 180 days after being signed into law by Mayor Bill de Blasio.

More specifically, New York City has proposed a package of five bills that would offer the following protections related to employee work schedules:

  • Employees would have the right to request a change in their work arrangements (e.g., schedule changes, location reassignments) without fear of retaliation and employers would be required to engage in an “interactive process” and provide a good faith response within two weeks of the request.
  • Employees would be afforded a right to receive certain changes to work arrangements in emergency situations, like a childcare emergency or personal health emergency.
  • Employers would be prohibited from engaging in on-call scheduling of retail employees.
  • Employers would be prohibited from providing a retail employee with less than 20 hours of work during any 14-day period.
  • Employers of fast food restaurants would be required to provide employees with an estimate of their work schedule upon hire and notice of work schedules 14 days in advance, subject to penalties for untimely notice.
  • Employers would be prohibited from making fast food employees work consecutive shifts when the first shift closes the establishment and the second shift opens it the next day (nicknamed “cloepening” shifts). Employers would be required to give fast food workers at least eleven hours off between such shifts and would pay a $100 premium to an employee every time he or she was made to work such consecutive cloepening shifts.
  • Employers of fast-food establishments would be required to offer available hours to existing employees up until the point that they would have to pay those existing employees overtime, or until all current employees have rejected such available hours, before they could hire new employees.

New York City’s efforts appear to be an attempt to prevent what many fear will be backlash against workers’ rights from the incoming Trump administration. The goal of these legislative measures is to lessen the wage gap in big cities, where the cost of living is typically higher, by offering low-wage workers the opportunity to budget in advance, plan for education or family care, and secure a second job, among other things. Those who oppose the initiatives raise several concerns. According to many business officials, the implementation of scheduling mandates on employers would result in rising costs and decreased efficiency because scheduling changes are typically initiated by employees. Another critic accused the New York City Council of acting as labor organizers, particularly in light of the penalties imposed, which are similar to collective bargaining provisions.

For more information on the pending New York City legislation and how the new requirements will affect your business, please contact John Vreeland, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Wage and Hour Compliance Group, at (973) 535-7118 or jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practices Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

Meet Trump’s Pick for the U.S. Department of Labor – CEO Andrew Puzder

President-elect Donald Trump tapped Andrew Puzder to lead the U.S. Department of Labor (“USDOL”) in his administration, an appointment that could have important implications for employers in terms of the USDOL’s recent hardline enforcement policies on joint employer relationships and independent contractor status. It also may signal how vigorously the USDOL will defend certain regulatory changes made under the current administration, such as the revised Persuader Rules (which significantly hinder an employer’s ability to use law firms during a union organizing campaign) and the amendment to the Fair Labor Standard Act’s “White Collar” exemptions (which more than doubles the minimum salary an employee must be paid in order to qualify for an overtime exemption). Both of these regulatory changes were blocked by federal courts last month and remain unenforceable unless the USDOL successfully appeals the federal courts’ injunctions.

Mr. Puzder has been CEO of CKE, which owns fast food chains Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr., since September 2000. CKE has 75,000 employees in the U.S. and nearly 100,000 worldwide. Mr. Puzder was an outspoken critic of the Labor Department under the Obama administration. He wrote multiple Wall Street Journal op-eds against any increase in the minimum wage or changes in overtime rules. Mr. Puzder has advocated for employers to consider automation in the face of rising employee costs.  Concerning automation, Mr. Puzder commented, “[machines are] always polite, they always upsell, they never take a vacation, they never show up late, there’s never a slip-and-fall, or an age, sex, or race discrimination case.” Mr. Puzder has written about how overregulation from Obamacare has held back the restaurant industry and has made the case for less regulation in the labor market.  In 2010, Mr. Puzder released a book with professor David Newton entitled “Job Creation: How it Really Works and Why Government Doesn’t Understand It.” Leading up to the 2012 election, Mr. Puzder was an economic advisor and spokesman for the Romney Campaign for President. This election cycle, Mr. Puzder was an advisor and fundraiser for the Trump campaign.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss how the change in the administration could affect your business, please contact John Vreeland, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Wage and Hour Compliance Group, at (973) 535-7118 or jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com, or Aaron C. Carter, Esq. at (973) 646-3275 or acarter@nullgenovaburns.com.