New York City Seeks to Ban Employer Inquiries Into Applicants’ Salary History

On April 5, 2017, the New York City Council passed a law amending the New York City Human Rights Law, barring all public and private New York City employers from asking job applicants about their prior wages and salary history.  The bill has been sent to Mayor DeBlasio for signature.  This new proposed law will take effect 180 days after Mayor DeBlasio signs it.

This bill would prohibit New York City employers from:

  • Making an inquiry, either verbally or in writing, to an applicant and/or the applicant’s current or prior employer, to obtain the applicant’s salary history;
  • Searching public records for an applicant’s salary history; and/or
  • Relying on a job applicant’s salary history when making an offer of employment or extending an employment contract to the applicant.

Salary history is broadly defined in the bill as the applicant’s “current or prior wage, benefits or other compensation.”  However, salary history inquiries do not include inquiries into the objective measure of the applicant’s productivity, for example, through inquiries on revenue, sales, or production reports.  Further, employers may still discuss the applicant’s salary and benefits expectations, including the amount of unvested equity and deferred compensation an applicant would forfeit through resignation from his or her current employment.

The bill contains several other exceptions to the prohibition on salary inquiries, which include the following:

  • Employers can consider and verify an applicant’s salary history if the applicant discloses the information voluntarily and without prompting;
  • Where federal, state, or local law specifically authorizes the disclosure or verification of salary history;
  • Where salary is determined by procedures in a collective bargaining agreement;
  • When current employees are transferred or promoted within the company; and
  • When a background check for non-salary related information inadvertently discloses salary history, provided the employer does not rely on that information in making an offer of employment.

The New York City’s Commission on Human Rights (NYCCHR) will be responsible for investigating complaints and enforcing the new law.  The NYCCHR will also have the authority to impose fines ranging from up to $125 for intentional violations and up to $250,000 for intentional malicious violations.

If Mayor DeBlasio signs this law, employers must immediately update their employment applications and train their recruiters and human resources personnel on the new requirements.  Employers may also be forced to limit the scope of their background checks and revise their notices under the Fair Credit Reporting Act.  For questions on this new proposed law, background check laws, or other employment and hiring requirements, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

Second, Eleventh and Seventh Circuits Disagree Whether Title VII Extends to Claims of Sexual Orientation Discrimination

On March 27 the Second Circuit held that Title VII does not provide protection against workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation. In Christiansen v. Omnicom Group Inc., the plaintiff alleged that his employer discharged him because of his sexual orientation and his nonconformity to gender stereotypes.  On appeal to the Second Circuit, the employer sought dismissal of the claims, and argued that claims of sexual orientation discrimination cannot be brought under Title VII.  Plaintiff urged the court to expand Title VII’s scope to reach these claims and, alternatively, that his suit claimed sexual stereotyping, as opposed to sexual orientation discrimination.  The Second Circuit held that it was bound by Second Circuit precedent in this regard and the plaintiff could not state a cognizable claim for sexual orientation discrimination under Title VII.  The Christensen court relied heavily on the Second Circuit’s 2000 decision in Simonton v. Runyon where the court held that Title VII does not prohibit sexual orientation discrimination.

The Christensen court observed that the landscape of sexual orientation and the law have changed significantly since Simonton.  Most notably, in 2013, the Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and in 2015, held that same-sex couples have the right to marry.  However, the Christensen court found that neither of these decisions relates to Title VII protections, but instead they reflect a change in social and judicial perceptions regarding protections for same-sex couples.

The Eleventh Circuit is in agreement with the Second Circuit.  However, on April 4 the Seventh Circuit en banc held that sexual orientation discrimination is cognizable under Title VII. Hively v. Ivy Tech Comm. College. The Seventh Circuit reversed a Circuit panel that found for the employer with reasoning consistent with the Christiansen decision. The EEOC’s enforcement position during the Obama Administration was that discrimination based on sexual orientation is prohibited by Title VII, although it remains to be seen whether this will change under the current administration.

Given the split in the Circuits and the rapid development of the law in this area, employers cannot ignore discrimination or harassment claims based on sexual orientation.  Several jurisdictions already have state and local laws that prohibit these workplace behaviors, including New Jersey, New York, and New York City.  Employers must review their anti-harassment and discrimination policies to ensure compliance not only with Title VII but also with state and local laws, and promptly and effectively respond to complaints of unlawful harassment and discrimination.

For more information on this decision, on the applicability of Title VII to your organization, or to ensure compliant employment practices, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

New York State Launches Aggressive Campaign to Enforce The New Minimum Wage Law

On December 31, 2016, the new minimum wage law in New York State took effect.  New York’s minimum wage law is among the most complicated in the country. The minimum wage will gradually increase to $15.00 in the coming years, with annual increases to take effect on December 31st. However, how quickly the minimum wage reaches $15.00 depends on where your company is located, the type of business you are in, and whether you are a small or a large employer. For example, the minimum wage in NYC will increase as follows:

New York City 10 or fewer employees 11 or more employees
December 31, 2016 $10.50 $11.00
December 31, 2017 $12.00 $13.00
December 31, 2018 $13.50 $15.00
December 31, 2019 $15.00

For Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester counties, the increments began December 31, 2016 and will conclude on December 31, 2021, with the following increases annually on December 31 no matter the size of the workforce: $10.00, $11.00, $12.00, $13.00, $14.00 and $15.00.  For the rest of New York State, the increments began December 31, 2016 and will conclude on December 31, 2020, with the following increases annually on December 31 no matter the size of the workforce: $9.70, $10.40, $11.10, $11.80, $12.50 and $15.00.

There is a special carve out for fast food companies.  By December 31, 2018, fast food companies in NYC will reach the $15.00 and by July 1, 2021 the rest of NY State’s fast food companies will reach $15.00.

The New York Department of Labor (NYDOL) plans to aggressively enforce the new law and has created a 200-investigator unit to ensure employers are appropriately increasing employee pay to at least the minimum wage. The newly formed State Minimum Wage Enforcement and Outreach Unit’s mission is to inform workers of the new minimum wage law and to ensure they are properly paid.  The State has also established a hotline for workers to report violations of the new minimum wage law. Hotline calls will initiate a NYDOL compliance audit.  If violations are found, a company is subject to a $3.00 fine for each hour the company failed to pay the required minimum wage to an employee plus back wages and liquidated damages.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss the new NYS minimum wage law and its effect on your business, please contact John Vreeland, Esq., Chair of the Wage & Hour Compliance Practice Group and a Partner in the Labor Law Practice Group at (973) 535-7118 or jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com, or Nicole L. Leitner, Esq., a member of the Wage & Hour Compliance and Labor Law Practice Groups at (973) 387-7897 or nleitner@nullgenovaburns.com.

NYC Joins the Pre-Trump Push for Employee Work Schedule Protections

New York City has joined several other cities, including San Francisco and Seattle, introducing legislation that offers more predictable, stable work schedules for employees in low-wage occupations. The legislation generally offers employees more notice of schedules, more access to extra hours, additional pay for last-minute schedule changes, and a mandated period of rest between certain back-to-back shifts. If passed, the legislation would take effect 180 days after being signed into law by Mayor Bill de Blasio.

More specifically, New York City has proposed a package of five bills that would offer the following protections related to employee work schedules:

  • Employees would have the right to request a change in their work arrangements (e.g., schedule changes, location reassignments) without fear of retaliation and employers would be required to engage in an “interactive process” and provide a good faith response within two weeks of the request.
  • Employees would be afforded a right to receive certain changes to work arrangements in emergency situations, like a childcare emergency or personal health emergency.
  • Employers would be prohibited from engaging in on-call scheduling of retail employees.
  • Employers would be prohibited from providing a retail employee with less than 20 hours of work during any 14-day period.
  • Employers of fast food restaurants would be required to provide employees with an estimate of their work schedule upon hire and notice of work schedules 14 days in advance, subject to penalties for untimely notice.
  • Employers would be prohibited from making fast food employees work consecutive shifts when the first shift closes the establishment and the second shift opens it the next day (nicknamed “cloepening” shifts). Employers would be required to give fast food workers at least eleven hours off between such shifts and would pay a $100 premium to an employee every time he or she was made to work such consecutive cloepening shifts.
  • Employers of fast-food establishments would be required to offer available hours to existing employees up until the point that they would have to pay those existing employees overtime, or until all current employees have rejected such available hours, before they could hire new employees.

New York City’s efforts appear to be an attempt to prevent what many fear will be backlash against workers’ rights from the incoming Trump administration. The goal of these legislative measures is to lessen the wage gap in big cities, where the cost of living is typically higher, by offering low-wage workers the opportunity to budget in advance, plan for education or family care, and secure a second job, among other things. Those who oppose the initiatives raise several concerns. According to many business officials, the implementation of scheduling mandates on employers would result in rising costs and decreased efficiency because scheduling changes are typically initiated by employees. Another critic accused the New York City Council of acting as labor organizers, particularly in light of the penalties imposed, which are similar to collective bargaining provisions.

For more information on the pending New York City legislation and how the new requirements will affect your business, please contact John Vreeland, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Wage and Hour Compliance Group, at (973) 535-7118 or jvreeland@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practices Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

NYC To Provide Municipal Employees With Six Weeks of Paid Maternity, Paternity, Adoption And Foster-Care Leave As of January 1, 2016

On December 22, 2015, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that he will sign an Executive Order granting municipal managers and non-unionized workers up to 6 weeks of paid maternity, paternity, adoption and foster-care leaves.  Starting on January 1, 2016, New York City employees are eligible to take the 6 weeks of paid leave at 100 percent of salary and it can also be combined with accrued sick leave and/or accrued vacation – so that employees will be able to take up to 12 weeks maternity, paternity, adoption, or foster care leave without losing pay.

To cover the $15 million cost, all non-union employees will see their vacation time reduced by two days, from 27 to 25 and the City will be repurposing the existing managerial raise of 0.47 percent scheduled for July 2017. The City’s unionized workers are not covered, unless a deal is reached with their representatives through collective bargaining. The new policy puts New York City at the forefront of city and state policies around the country.  New York City joins Portland, San Francisco and Cincinnati which have also recently approved paid parental leave policies.  In the private sector, companies such as Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Twitter and Netflix have also joined the growing trend to provide workers with paid paternal leave.

For more information regarding how your business can implement paid sick leave, please Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Director of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com or 973-533-0777.

Important Deadline Approaching Under New York City’s Paid Sick Leave Law

By Thursday, May 1, 2014, covered employers under New York City’s Earned Sick Time Act, also known as the Paid Sick Leave Law, must distribute a written notice to existing employees regarding their rights under the Paid Sick Leave Law. This notice is available on the Department of Consumer Affairs website: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dca/downloads/pdf/MandatoryNotice.pdf. This notice must also be distributed to all new hires, first employed on or after April 1, 2014. The notice must set forth your calendar year, including the start and end date as each employer’s calendar year may differ.

Effective April 1, 2014, covered employers should have begun complying with the Paid Sick Leave Law. Under the Paid Sick Leave Law,  employers with 5 or more employees must provide up to 40 hours of paid sick leave per calendar year for employees who work more than 80 hours per calendar year. A calendar year is defined as any regular and consecutive twelve month period of time as determined by the employer. Eligible employees accrue 1 hour for every 30 hours worked and should have begun accruing sick time effective April 1, 2014. Employees can begin using their sick leave 120 days after their first day of employment. For existing employees, this means that they can begin using their accrued sick leave as of July 30, 2014. Employers must retain records documenting compliance with law for at least three years.

If your current paid leave policy provides eligible employees with paid leave that meets the requirements of the Act and allows employees to use the leave for the purposes covered under the Act, you are not required to provide additional leave.

Please note that there are exceptions to the Paid Sick Leave Law. For example, employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement in effect as of April 1, 2014 will not be covered under the Act until the collective bargaining agreement terminates. The Act also does not apply to employees of government agencies.

For more information on the Paid Sick Leave Law and how you it may affect your current policies, please contact Dena B. Calo, Esq., Director of the Human Resources Practice Group and Partner in the Employment Law & Litigation Group, at dcalo@nullgenovaburns.com, or Erica B. Lowenthal, Esq., Associate in the Employment Law & Litigation Group, at elowenthal@nullgenovaburns.com.