NLRB Sets the Example for Sound Social Media Policies

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) recently issued its Third Report on social media cases. In doing so, it emphasized the importance of clarifying permissible and prohibited conduct through the use of examples. By using examples in this context, employers can avoid situations where an employee can reasonably interpret the social media policy as restricting Section 7 rights under the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) which protects protected concerted activity when employees communicate with one another to discuss the terms and conditions of their employment. Moreover, providing examples can prevent a social media policy from being found to be overbroad.

In its review of social media cases, the NLRB Third Report cites many instances where policies were found to violate the NLRA because they did not include clarifying examples. For instance, a policy that instructed employees to not release confidential information regarding guests, team members or the company was impermissible because there was no limiting language or context to assure employees that Section 7 rights were not restricted. In addition, a policy instructing employees to ensure that posts were accurate and not misleading was overbroad because it could be interpreted to prohibit employee discussions about working conditions and did not provide examples of the prohibited conduct.

However, the NLRB Third Report pinpoints a few instances where policies that were otherwise overbroad were nevertheless found to be lawful due to the inclusion of clarifying examples. A policy prohibiting harassment, bullying, discrimination, and retaliation between co-workers in the workplace and online (even if it was after work hours) was found to be permissible because a list of prohibited conduct was provided, and included only plainly egregious activity. Finally, the NLRB found that Wal-Mart’s social media policy was valid in its entirety, and attached the entire policy to the report as an “example” of how “examples” can be used effectively to prevent a social media policy from being overbroad or interpreted as infringing upon Section 7 rights under the NLRA.

If you need assistance regarding an existing social media policy or with developing a new social media policy, please contact Joseph M. Hannon, Esq., jhannon@nullgenovaburns.com or Brett M. Pugach, Esq., bpugach@nullgenovaburns.com, in the Labor Law Practice Group.