New Jersey Issues Mandatory Notice for Compliance with New Jersey’s Paid Sick Leave Act

The New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL) has issued its long awaited mandatory notice for compliance with the New Jersey Paid Sick Leave Act (“the Act”) which goes into effect on October 29, 2018. The “Notice of Employee Rights” can be found here.

All New Jersey employers regardless of size must:

  • Post the notice in a conspicuous place accessible to all employees in each New Jersey workplace; and
  • Distribute the notice (1) to all existing employees by November 29, 2018; (2) at the time of hiring; and (3) if the employee requests a copy of the notice.

The required notice may be distributed by email. Employers are not required to obtain signed acknowledgments confirming that employees received the notice.

The notice must be also be posted and distributed in any language that the employer believes is the first language of a majority of the employer’s workforce. In addition to English, the NJDOL will release the notice in 12 additional languages, including Spanish, Chinese, and Arabic. The NJDOL has advised that translations will be available on its website soon.

Under the new law, employees accrue 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked. Employees (hourly, salaried, full-time, part-time) may accrue up to 40 hours of paid sick leave per benefit year.  Employers are also permitted to designate the “benefit year” as any 12-month period but may not modify it without notifying the NJDOL.

Employees become eligible to use earned sick leave beginning on the 120th day after they are hired, and may use their earned sick leave as it is accrued. Employers are also permitted “frontload” 40 hours of paid sick time. There is no requirement to pay out accrued and unused sick leave upon termination absent a company policy to the contrary.

Coverage

Permissible use of sick leave, which will accrue at the rate of one hour for every 30 hours worked up to 40 hours per benefit year, includes the following:

(i) Diagnosis, care, treatment, recovery and/or preventive care for the employee’s own mental or physical illness or injury or the employee’s family member’s mental or physical illness or injury;

(ii) Absence due to a public health emergency declared by a public official that causes the closure of the employee’s workplace or the school or childcare facility of the employee’s child or requires the employee or an employee’s family member to seek care;

(iii) A necessary absence for medical, legal or other victim services because of domestic or sexual violence perpetrated on the employee or the employee’s family member; or

(iv) To attend a school-conferences, meetings, or any event requested or required by a child’s school administrator, teacher, or other professional staff member responsible for the child’s education, or to attend a meeting regarding a child’s health or disability.

The Act also broadly defines “family members” to include an employee’s child, spouse, domestic partner, civil union partner, parent (including adoptive, foster or step-parent, or legal guardian), sibling (including foster or adoptive siblings), grandparent or grandchild, and the parent, grandparent or sibling of the employee’s spouse, domestic partner or civil union partner. Notably, an employee has the opportunity to use their sick leave for the care of a non-related individual whose close association with the employee is the “equivalent” of a family relationship.

Exemptions & Employees Covered by a CBA

Per diem healthcare employees, construction workers subject to a collective bargaining agreement (CBA), and public employees who are provided with sick leave with full payment pursuant to any other law, rule or regulation are exempt from the new law. Non-construction employees covered by a CBA at the time the law goes into effect are also exempt, but the Act’s provisions will apply once the CBA expires. Further, employees and their representatives may waive the rights available under the law and address paid leave in collective bargaining.

Notice

Employers are entitled to 7 days advance notice of “foreseeable” absences and can restrict employee’s use of “foreseeable” paid sick leave on certain dates.  Where the need is unforeseeable, an employer may only require notice “as soon as practicable,” if the employer has notified the employee of this requirement.  In addition, employers are only permitted to ask the employee for documentation to substantiate the sick leave if the employee is absent for 3 or more consecutive days.

Compliance

Employers will be required to maintain records documenting the hours worked and earned sick leave used by employees. Records must be maintained for 5 years and made available for inspection by the NJDOL. If an employee claims an employer violated the Act, and that employer has failed to maintain adequate records, then there is a presumption that the employer failed to provide paid sick leave.

Anti-Retaliation

Employers are prohibited from retaliating or discriminating against employees under the Act. The Act broadly defines retaliation to include not only retaliatory personnel action like suspension, demotion, or refusal to promote, but also includes threatening to report the immigrant status of an employee or family member of the employee. Employers are also prohibited from retaliating or discriminating against an employee who files a complaint with the commissioner or a court alleging the employer’s violation of the Act, or informs any other person of their rights under the Act.

There is a rebuttable presumption of unlawful retaliatory action whenever an employer takes adverse action against an employee within 90 days of when that employee opposes any violation of the Act, informs any person about the employer’s alleged violation of the Act, files a complaint alleging a violation of the Act, or cooperates in an investigation into an alleged violation of the Act.

Penalties

Any failure of an employer to make available or pay earned sick leave as required by the new law, or any other violation of the law, shall be regarded as a failure to meet the wage payment requirements of the New Jersey Wage and Hour Law.  Employers will also be subject to the penalties and remedies contained in the New Jersey Wage and Hour Law, including fines and possible imprisonment, reinstatement of a discharged employee to correct any discriminatory action and payment of all lost wages in full.

Bottom Line

The New Jersey Paid Sick Leave Act takes effect on October 29, 2018. Employers in New Jersey, in consultation with legal counsel, must post the notice and review and revise existing policies, practices and procedures related to calculating employee’s sick leave to ensure compliance with the Act.  Human Resources and Benefits personnel should also be trained on the new paid sick leave law requirements and Managers should also receive updated training to ensure that internal recordkeeping processes are sufficient to keep track of time taken under the new law.

For more information on New Jersey’s new paid sick leave law, see the June issue of New Jersey Employment Law Letter.

For more information about the potential impacts of the Paid Sick Leave Act or what steps your company can take to effectively ensure compliance with wage and hour laws, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at  jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

Religion at Work: NJ Appellate Court Reinstates Religious Harassment Lawsuit Over Shaving Mandate

The New Jersey Appellate Division has ruled that a lawsuit against the New Jersey Department of Corrections (NJDOC) can proceed for failure to accommodate a trainee’s religious practice.

Background Facts

In July 2016, Marven Roseus, a member of the Israel United in Christ faith, applied to become a NJDOC corrections officer. While attending an orientation meeting, Roseus informed lieutenants that his religion prohibits him from shaving his head or face. Roseus submitted a religious accommodation request which included a statement from an elder in his church explaining that his religion requires that he not shave either his head or face.

After submitting his request, Roseus arrived for his first day of training, and was told that he was not “properly shaven.”  Even though Roseus explained that his request for a religious accommodation, Roseus was written up and dismissed from training.

On January 9, 2017, Roseus filed a complaint against the State of New Jersey and the NJDOC alleging discriminatory practices and a failure to accommodate a sincerely held religious belief, in violation of the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (NJLAD) which prohibits employers from imposing a condition on employees that “would require a person to violate or forego a sincerely held religious practice or observance” unless, “after engaging in bona fide effort, the employer demonstrates that it is unable to reasonably accommodate the employee’s religious observance or practice without undue hardship on the conduct of the employer’s business.” N.J.S.A. 10:5-12(q)(1).

The State and NJDOC moved to dismiss Roseus’ complaint, and the trial court dismissed the case on June 30, 2017.

Appellate Court’s Decision

The Appellate Division ruled that Roseus’ complaint should be reinstated finding that there was no evidence the NJDOC acted in “a bona fide effort” or that it is “unable to reasonably accommodate” his religious practice without a “undue hardship.” An “undue hardship”, as defined by the NJLAD, must be one requiring “unreasonable expense or difficulty, unreasonable interference with the safe or efficient operation of the workplace or a violation of a bona fide seniority system or a violation of any provision of a bona fide collective bargaining agreement.” N.J.S.A. 10:5-12(q)(3)(a).

In its decision, the Appellate Division distinguished a 2008 ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Valdes v. New Jersey. In Valdes, an applicant sought to become a corrections officer, and sought an accommodation to not shave his beard based upon his religious beliefs. This request was initially denied, but the NJDOC eventually granted an accommodation and allowed the applicant to retain his facial hair so long as it was not longer than one-eighth of an inch. When the applicant did not shave his beard to the agreed upon length, he was terminated. The Appellate Division points out that although seemingly similar to the facts at hand, Valdes was distinguishable in a number of ways, including, most notably, that an accommodation was offered in Valdes, whereas Roseus was offered no such accommodation.

The Appellate Division also noted that because Roseus sufficiently alleged that the NJDOC has previously granted accommodations to its grooming policy, Roseus was entitled to discovery to explore whether there was a bona fide effort made to accommodate his religious beliefs. Moreover, the State and NJDOC did not explain the reasons for the grooming policy, nor did they demonstrate they attempted to accommodate Roseus.

Bottom Line

This case serves as a reminder that employers must engage in the interactive process in order to determine whether or not an employee’s sincerely held religious belief requires an accommodation in the workplace.  Accommodation requests often relate to change in work schedules, exceptions to dress and grooming policies, or time for religious expression or practice while at work.  In many cases, employers who face costly litigation are those where supervisors refuse an accommodation request without exploring other ways to accommodate the employee. Employers should also take pro-active steps to ensure they have the following:

  • A compliant Anti-Harassment Policy that covers religion and creed.
  • An accommodation policy that covers religious beliefs, practices or observances.
  • Train Managers and Supervisors on how to document and respond to requests for a religious accommodation and address complaints about religious harassment.

For more information on what your company can do to ensure compliance with religious accommodations in the workplace, please contact  John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

No Roman Holiday: New Jersey Appellate Division Says Employees Must Submit Sexual-Harassment and Discrimination Claims to Arbitration

August 23, 2018 was a busy day for the New Jersey Appellate Division on the arbitration front when it issued two opinions effectively upholding the enforceability of arbitration agreements.  Both cases involved sexual-harassment and discrimination claims brought by employees against their former employers under the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (“NJLAD”).  In D.M. v. Same Day Delivery Service, Inc., et al., the Appellate Division held that a former employee was bound by the terms of an arbitration agreement, even though the language in a few sentences were “poorly written” and “didn’t make sense.”  In Roman v. Bergen Logistics, LLC, et al., the Appellate Division held that a former employee was required to arbitrate her claims, but added that, contrary to the terms of her agreement, she could also seek punitive and exemplary damages in arbitration.

Same Day provides some clarity for Arbitration Agreement language

In Same Day, an employee filed a complaint in New Jersey state court against both her former employer and her former manager, asserting claims under the NJLAD.  The employee had been hired as a delivery person by Same Day Delivery, Inc. and worked as a driver for just over two months.  During the time of her employment, the employee alleged that her manager had made “sexually provocative comments” about her body and subjected her to a hostile work environment on account of her sex and sexual orientation.  Furthermore, the employee maintained that she was fired in retaliation for rejecting her manager’s advances.

The employer moved to dismiss the complaint and compel arbitration, asserting that the employee had electronically signed an arbitration agreement along with her employment application, which she had submitted through the company’s online recruiting platform, and was therefore required to submit her claims to binding arbitration.  In response, the employee argued that the arbitration agreement was unenforceable and pointed to certain sentences with ambiguous and unclear language, which she contended made the whole agreement incomprehensible to an employee of average intelligence and thus invalid.  Particularly at issue was the wording of the last sentence of the agreement, which stated “I am agree to waive my voluntarily and knowingly, and free from any duress or coercion whatsoever to a trial by a trial judge or jury as well as my right to participate in a class or collective action.”  The trial court found that, although this sentence “doesn’t make sense,” the rest of the agreement was sufficiently clear to make the agreement enforceable and therefore entered an order directing arbitration and dismissing the complaint.  The employee appealed.

Giving further support to the federal and state policies favoring the arbitration of disputes, the New Jersey Appellate Division affirmed the trial court’s finding that the poorly drafted language did not make the whole agreement ambiguous to the extent that it was invalid because the remainder of the document was clearly written.  In reaching this conclusion, the Appellate Division addressed the issue of what language would make an arbitration agreement clear and understandable to an ordinary reader.  At the outset, the Appellate Division noted that the standard in New Jersey for an enforceable arbitration agreement is that the language clearly state that the employer and employee(s) are 1) agreeing to arbitrate and 2) agreeing to waive the right to pursue a claim in court.  Notably, this standard does not require a “particular form of words,” but, being mindful that these agreements involve a waiver of rights, the language must be such that the employee has full knowledge of his/her legal rights and, by signing, demonstrate his/her intent to surrender those rights.  The Appellate Division also noted that such an agreement will pass muster when it is phrased in plain language that is understandable to an average member of the public, who may not know that arbitration is a substitute for the right to sue.

Roman: don’t waive punitive damages goodbye

In Roman, the court confronted an arbitration agreement which stated, among other things, that the employee had waived her right to pursue punitive damages for all employment matters, including those related to wrongful termination, discrimination, harassment, retaliation, and any other violation of state and federal law.  The employee was hired by Bergen Logistics, LLC as a human resources generalist and signed an arbitration agreement as an express condition of her hiring and continued employment. The employee was terminated within four months of her hire date, after which point she filed a complaint in New Jersey state court against her employer and her former supervisor, asserting claims under the NJLAD and for intentional infliction of emotional distress.  The employee alleged that, during the time of her employment, her supervisor had sexually harassed her and had created a sexually hostile work environment and she further alleged that her termination was retaliation for her objecting to the supervisor’s sexual advances.

The employer moved to dismiss the complaint and compel arbitration, asserting that the employee was obligated to arbitrate her claims pursuant to the agreement that she had signed at the outset of her employment.  In response, the employee argued that the arbitration agreement was unenforceable because it barred the recovery of punitive damages, which the NJLAD makes explicitly available to victims of discrimination.  Unpersuaded, the trial court found that the agreement was a clear and unambiguous waiver of claims for punitive damages, that the employee knowingly signed the agreement, and that the agreement covered the claims set forth in the complaint.  The trial court accordingly entered an order upholding the enforceability of the agreement and dismissing the complaint.  The employee then appealed, again contending that a waiver of punitive damages should not be enforced.

In reviewing the trial court’s decision, the New Jersey Appellate Division noted that the federal and states policies favoring arbitration are “not without limits.”  In this vein, the Appellate Division focused its review on the relationship of the waiver-of-rights provision in arbitration agreements to the rights afforded by the NJLAD.  The Appellate Division determined that the NJLAD permits the recovery of punitive damages to victims of discrimination for an important, public-interest purpose, namely the deterrence and punishment of the most egregious discriminatory conduct by employees who, by virtue of their positions in upper management, control employer policies that should prevent discriminatory conduct in the workplace.  The Appellate Division held that this is a “substantive right” that cannot be waived by agreement between an employee and his/her employer.  Therefore, that Appellate Division modified the trial court’s decision by affirming that the employee must arbitrate her claims and adding that she was permitted to include claims for punitive and exemplary damages in the arbitration proceeding.

Bottom Line

While these opinions reaffirm the compelling federal and state policies that favor the arbitration of disputes, they also illuminate equally compelling, and at times competing, public interests at play within the broader scope of employer-employee relations in the state of New Jersey.  Courts in New Jersey have consistently recognized the benefits of arbitration as providing an inexpensive and efficient means of dispute resolution.  Furthermore, the agreement between the employee and employer to pursue arbitration as expressed in the form of a contract has been strictly enforced, in most instances.  However, these recent opinions make it clear that the enforceability of arbitration agreements depends, in part, on the clarity of the plain language used as well as on the rights that the employee and employer have agreed to waive.  These recent opinions should serve as cautionary tales that the public interests of clarity in contract and an employee’s right to a discrimination-free workplace are some of the many considerations that employers must have when crafting arbitration agreements with the assistance of counsel.

For more information on what your company can do to ensure its arbitration agreement will be enforceable, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

New Jersey Passes Mandatory Paid Sick Leave

On May 2, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed a law mandating all private and public New Jersey employers, regardless of size, offer paid sick leave. This makes New Jersey the 10th state to adopt mandatory paid sick leave legislation. The Paid Sick Leave Act (“the Act”) also permits employees to use the leave for their own care or for the care of a family member and expands how paid sick leave can be used, encompassing protections beyond the federal Family Leave and Medical Act, the New Jersey Family Leave Act as well as other leave laws. The new law also fully pre-empts the 13 municipalities in New Jersey with local paid sick leave ordinances, allowing employers to adopt a state-wide uniform paid sick leave policy.

Coverage

Permissible use of sick leave includes the following:

(i) Diagnosis, care, treatment, recovery and/or preventive care for the employee’s own mental or physical illness or injury or the employee’s family member’s mental or physical illness or injury;

(ii) Absence due to a public health emergency declared by a public official that causes the closure of the employee’s workplace or the school or childcare facility of the employee’s child or requires the employee or an employee’s family member to seek care;

(iii) A necessary absence for medical, legal or other victim services because of domestic or sexual violence perpetrated on the employee or the employee’s family member; or

(iv) To attend a school-conferences, meetings, or any event requested or required by a child’s school administrator, teacher, or other professional staff member responsible for the child’s education, or to attend a meeting regarding a child’s health or disability.

The Act also broadly defines “family members” to include an employee’s child, spouse, domestic partner, civil union partner, parent (including adoptive, foster or step-parent, or legal guardian), sibling (including foster or adoptive siblings), grandparent or grandchild, and the parent, grandparent or sibling of the employee’s spouse, domestic partner or civil union partner. Notably, an employee has the opportunity to use their sick leave for the care of a non-related individual whose close association with the employee is the “equivalent” of a family relationship.

Exemptions & Employees Covered by a CBA

Per diem healthcare employees, construction workers subject to a collective bargaining agreement (CBA), and public employees who are provided with sick leave with full payment pursuant to any other law, rule or regulation are exempt from the new law. Non-construction employees covered by a CBA at the time the law goes into effect are also not effect, but will apply once the agreement expires. Further, employees and their representatives may waive the rights available under the law and address paid leave in collective bargaining.

Accrual of Paid Sick Leave

Under the new law, employees accrue 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked. Employees may accrue up to 40 hours of paid sick leave per benefit year.  Employers are also permitted to designate the “benefit year” as any 12-month period but may not modify it without notifying the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL).

Employees become eligible to use earned sick leave beginning on the 120th day after they are hired, and may use their earned sick leave as it is accrued. Employers are also permitted to offer, or “frontload” 40 hours of paid sick time or utilize a paid-time-off (“PTO”) policy as long as it provides equal or greater benefits and accrue benefits at an equal or greater rate than the benefits provided under the Act. There is no requirement to payout accrued and unused sick leave upon termination absent a company policy to the contrary.

Upon the mutual consent of the employee and employer, an employee may voluntarily choose to work additional hours or shifts during the same or following pay period, in lieu of hours or shifts missed, but shall not be required to work additional hours or shifts or use accrued earned sick leave. In addition, an employer may not require, as a condition of an employee’s using earned sick leave, that the employee search for or find a replacement worker to cover the hours during which the employee is using earned sick leave.

Notice

Employers are entitled to 7 days advance notice of “foreseeable” absences and can restrict employee’s use of “foreseeable” paid sick leave on certain dates.  Where the need is unforeseeable, an employer may only require notice “as soon as practicable,” if the employer has notified the employee of this requirement.  In addition, employers are only permitted to ask the employee for documentation to substantiate the sick leave if the employee is absent for 3 or more consecutive days.

Compliance

Employers will be required to maintain records documenting the hours worked and earned sick leave used by employees. Records must be maintained for 5 years and made available for inspection by the NJDOL. If an employee claims an employer violated the Act, and that employer that has failed to maintain adequate records, then there is a presumption that the employer failed to provide paid sick leave.

Employers must also post a notification and distribute a written notification alerting employees of their rights within 30 days of the notice being issued by the NJDOL and provide the notification to all new employees at the time of hiring.

Anti-Retaliation

Employers are prohibited from retaliating or discriminating against employees under the Act. The Act broadly defines retaliation to include not only retaliatory personnel action like suspension, demotion, or refusal to promote, but also includes threatening to report the immigrant status of an employee or family member of the employee. Employers are also prohibited from retaliating or discriminating against an employee who files a complaint with the commissioner or a court alleging the employer’s violation of the Act, or informs any other person of their rights under the Act.

There is a rebuttable presumption of unlawful retaliatory action whenever an employer takes adverse action against an employee within 90 days of when that employee opposes any violation of the Act, informs any person about the employer’s alleged violation of the Act, files a complaint alleging a violation of the Act, or cooperates in an investigation into an alleged violation of the Act.

Penalties

Any failure of an employer to make available or pay earned sick leave as required by the new law, or any other violation of the law, shall be regarded as a failure to meet the wage payment requirements of the New Jersey Wage and Hour Law.  Employers will also be subject to the penalties and remedies contained in the New Jersey Wage and Hour Law, including fines and possible imprisonment, reinstatement of a discharged employee to correct any discriminatory action and payment of all lost wages in full.

Bottom Line

The New Jersey Paid Sick Leave Act takes effect in 180 days, on October 29, 2018. Employers in New Jersey, in consultation with legal counsel, must review and revise existing policies, practices and procedures related to calculating employee’s sick leave to ensure compliance with the Act.  Human Resources and Benefits personnel should also be trained on the new paid sick leave law requirements and Managers should also receive updated training to ensure that internal recordkeeping processes are sufficient to keep track of time taken under the new law.

For more information about the potential impacts of the Paid Sick Leave Act or what steps your company can take to effectively ensure compliance with wage and hour laws, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

New Jersey Takes the Lead in Equal Pay Act Legislation

Following up on his January 16, 2018 Executive Order promoting equal pay for equal work, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed a historic and sweeping equal pay law on April 24, 2018. The “Diane B. Allen Equal Pay Act” was named after former Republican Senator Diane B. Allen, herself a victim of bias, who was part of the original negotiations surrounding the bill when it was first proposed under former Governor Chris Christie. The new Equal Pay Act applies to all employers in New Jersey regardless of size and is scheduled to take effect on July 1, 2018. The new law combats not only gender pay discrimination but also wage discrimination against those protected by the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (NJLAD).

Coverage

The Equal Pay Act amends the NJLAD and now makes it illegal for an employer to pay any employees who are members of a protected class recognized under the NJLAD at a lower compensation than other employees who are not members of a protected class, for “substantially similar work,” unless a pay differential is justified by legitimate business necessity. Under the NJLAD, protected classes include race, creed, sex, color, national origin, ancestry, nationality, disability, age, pregnancy or breastfeeding, marital, civil union or domestic partnership status, affectional or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, military status, and genetic information or atypical hereditary cellular or blood traits. “Substantially similar work” is determined by a combination of the “skill, effort and responsibility” required for that position and is not limited to employees who work within a specific geographic area or region.

Moreover, although the legislation carves out an exception for differential pay based on certain factors like merit, seniority, and education, this exception is only so long as these factors do not perpetuate a sex-based differential in compensation. For example, if one employee has a different title than another employee or even works in a different department, but both employees perform the same types of tasks with similar levels of responsibility, both employees should be paid the same.

An employer may pay a different rate of compensation only if the employer demonstrates that the differential is made pursuant to a seniority system, a merit system, or the employer demonstrates:

  • The differential is based on one or more legitimate, bona fide factors other than the characteristics of members of the protected class (like training, education, experience, or the quantity or quality of production);
  • The factors are not based on, and do not perpetuate, a differential in compensation based on sex or any other characteristic protected under the NJLAD;
  • Each of the factors must be applied reasonably;
  • One or more factors account for the entire wage differential; and
  • The factors are job-related with respect to the position in question and based on a legitimate business necessity.

Prohibitions

The new law also makes it easier for employees to win pay-discrimination cases since all they would need to show is that they were paid unequally for “substantially similar” work, rather than the previous standard of “substantially equal” work. Employers are also not permitted to reduce the rate of compensation of any employee in order to achieve compliance.

The new law also prohibits employers from retaliating against employees who (1) oppose any practices or acts forbidden under the Act; (2) seek legal advice regarding rights under the Act; (3) share relevant information with legal counsel or a governmental entity; or (4) file a complaint, testifies or assists in any proceeding.  The Act also forbids coercion, intimidation, threats or interference with any person in the exercise or enjoyment of, or on account of that person having aided or encouraged any other person in the exercise or enjoyment of, any right granted or protected by the Act.

Statute of Limitations

In addition to any other relief authorized by the NJLAD, liability under the new law shall accrue, and an aggrieved person may obtain relief for back pay, for up to 6 years, so long as the violations continue within the 6-year period. The law also makes it unlawful to require employees or prospective employees to consent to a shortened statute of limitations or to waive any of the protections afforded under the NJLAD.

Available Damages

In addition to the damages permitted under the NJLAD, the new law allows victims of discrimination to recover triple damages should a jury, or the New Jersey Division of Civil Rights, determine that the employer is guilty of an unlawful employment practice as defined by the law.

Reporting Obligations

To ensure companies doing business with the state comply, companies that win contracts from public agencies are required to submit reports to the Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development. These reports would need to include the gender and race of employees in every job title or pay band, and the total compensation for each category of employees.

Bottom Line

Employers should carefully analyze their existing pay practices to ensure compliance. Prior to July 1, 2018, employers must review the current job descriptions, employee handbooks and policies to determine which employees perform “substantially similar work” in order to ensure they are being compensated at the same rate. If, after doing this review, there is a pay differential, the employer must be able to show that the difference is not based on sex or any other characteristic of members of a protected class. Existing handbooks and policies must also be revised to prohibit pay discrimination for substantially similar work, and prohibit retaliation against employees who request, discuss or disclose compensation or other job-related information covered by the law. Human resources and benefits personnel should also be trained on the new requirements and managers should also receive updated training.

Employers must also be aware that the provision for back pay damages is much more extensive than federal law, and the possibility of treble damages should a jury find that an employer is guilty of an unlawful employment practice should serve as a powerful deterrent to correct discriminatory pay differentials.  Lastly, employers who work with public entities must ensure that payroll records and other information regarding the “gender, race, job title, occupational category and rate of compensation” of every employee that is part of the project is up to date and sent to the public entity.

For more information regarding the impacts of this legislation and how to implement nondiscriminatory pay practices, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Director of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com or 973-533-0777.

New York City Updates Its Requirements for Reasonable Accommodations in Places of Public Accommodation

On January 19, 2018, New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio signed into law an amendment to the New York City Human Rights Law (NYCHRL) requiring employers and operators of public accommodations and housing in New York City to “engage in cooperative dialogue with persons who are or may be entitled to reasonable accommodations” and “provide any person requesting an accommodation who participated in the cooperative dialogue with a written final determination identifying any accommodation granted or denied.” The NYCHRL is generally applicable to employers with 4 or more employees, prohibits unlawful discrimination in employment based on protected characteristics and requires employers to provide certain reasonable accommodations. The law extends coverage to franchisors, franchisees, lessors, lessees, and managing agents of public and housing accommodations.

Cooperative dialogue is defined in the Ordinance as “the process by which a covered entity and a person entitled to an accommodation, or who may be entitled to an accommodation under the law, engage in good faith in a written or oral dialogue concerning the person’s needs.” The cooperative dialogue process applies to all accommodation requests relating to disability, religion, pregnancy or childbirth (including medical conditions), and victims of domestic violence, sex offenses, or stalking.  According to the Ordinance, the cooperative dialogue requires employers to, in good faith, engage in a written or oral dialogue concerning the following:

  • the person’s accommodation needs;
  • potential accommodations that may address the person’s accommodation needs, including alternatives; and
  • difficulties that such potential accommodations may pose for the employer.

After the cooperative dialogue has taken place, all employers must ensure that they provide any person requesting an accommodation with a final written determination indicating whether any accommodations were granted or denied. Failure to provide written documentation,  even if the accommodation is granted, is considered an unlawful discriminatory practice under the NYSHRL.

Although the amendments do not take effect until October 15, 2018,  employers and other entities covered by this law should swiftly and meticulously review their reasonable accommodation policies to ensure compliance with the law. At minimum, each policy should require a cooperative dialogue  applicable to the categories of accommodations described above and require a written final determination given to the individual requesting the reasonable accommodation.

For more information about how this new bill affects your company or how your company can effectively implement it, please contact John C. Petrella, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Employment Litigation Practice Group, at jpetrella@nullgenovaburns.com, or Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy Signs First Executive Order for Equal Pay and Gender Equality

In his first official act as Governor of the State of New Jersey, Governor Phil Murphy issued an Executive Order on January 16, 2018 promoting equal pay for equal work in New Jersey. The Executive Order, which is set to take effect February 1, 2018, provides that all New Jersey workers should be compensated based on their work and the services they provide, regardless of gender. The Executive Order further states that currently, women of all ethnicities in New Jersey who hold full-time, year-round jobs are paid less than men in those same positions.

Fulfilling a campaign promise and following in the footsteps of other states and major cities around the country, the Governor’s Office seeks to fix this wage gap in various ways. Since asking for prior compensation information can be part of the application process, the Executive Order directs that no State entity is permitted to ask employment applicants about their current or previous salaries until after a conditional offer of employment has been made. In the event an applicant refuses to volunteer such information, that refusal cannot be considered in employment decisions. If a State entity does have a job applicant’s compensation information, that information cannot be used in an employment decision. Further, the Executive Order provides that State entities can only request and verify current or previous compensation information prior to a conditional offer of employment if such information was voluntarily provided or if verification is required by federal, state, or local law.  A “State entity” is definied in the Executive Order as “any of the principal departments in the Executive Branch of State government and any agency, authority, board, bureau, commission, division, institution, office, or other instrumentality within or created by any such department, and any independent State authority, commission, instrumentality, or agency over which the Governor exercises executive authority, as determined by the Attorney General.”

To enforce this Executive Order, the Governor’s Office of Employee Relations is tasked with overseeing the implementation and training of staff at State entities so that they can comply. For those who are improperly asked about their salary history, such violations can be reported to the Governor’s Office of Employee Relations. Reporting such violations to the Governor’s Office of Employee Relations is the sole remedy, as the Executive Order does not create a private right of action for employees or prospective employees in the event they are improperly asked about their salary history.

Although the Executive Order only impacts State entities, Governor Murphy indicated that he would make it state law if the Legislature presents him with a bill extending these protections to private businesses.  California, Massachusetts, Delaware, Oregon, and several other U.S. cities, including New York City, Philadelphia, and San Francisco, have all enacted policies that prohibit employers from asking about prospective employees’ salary histories.

For more information regarding the potential impacts of this Executive Order and how to implement nondiscriminatory pay practices, please contact Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Director of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com or 973-533-0777.

New York City’s Salary Inquiry Ban Starts October 31, 2017

Starting October 31, 2017, New York City employers will be prohibited from inquiring about a job applicant’s salary history, or from relying on that salary history in determining an applicant’s prospective pay, unless the applicant voluntarily offers the information.

What New York City Employers Cannot Do

Under the salary inquiry law, employers cannot, during an in-person interview that takes place in New York City, or in any circumstances where the impact will be felt in New York City:

  • Communicate any question or statement to a job applicant, the applicant’s current or former employer, or a current or former employee who worked with the applicant, to obtain the applicant’s salary history;
  • Search public records to obtain an applicant’s salary history; and/or
  • Rely on an applicant’s salary history when making an offer of employment or deciding compensation, unless the applicant voluntarily and without prompting disclosed it.

What New York City Employers Can Do

New York City employers may consider and verify a job applicant’s salary history if:

  • The job applicant discloses the information voluntarily and without prompting;
  • Law specifically authorizes the disclosure or verification of salary history;
  • The position’s salary is determined by procedures in a collective bargaining agreement;
  • The applicant is a current employee applying for an internal transfer or promotion; and/or
  • A background check for non-salary related information inadvertently discloses salary history, provided, however, that the employer does not rely on that inadvertently disclosed salary history in determining the job applicant’s prospective salary.

The Scope of One’s “Salary History”

  • “Salary history” means current or prior wages, benefits or other compensation.
  • It does not include objective measures of the applicant’s history of productivity. Employers may ask about sales performance or other objective indicators of performance like volume or value, but cannot ask about how these figures translated into wages.
  • Employers may also discuss and consider the applicant’s salary and benefits expectations, including the amount of unvested equity and deferred compensation an applicant would forfeit from his or her current employer.

Consequences of Violating New York City’s Salary Inquiry Ban

The New York City Commission on Human Rights will investigate complaints and enforce the new law by imposing fines of up to $125,000 for unintentional violations, and up to $250,000 for intentional violations.

Tips and Next  Steps for New York City Employers

  • Update Your Company Policies, Job Application Materials, and Interview Guides
  • It is not enough to add a disclaimer that individuals in New York City or applying for jobs located in New York City need not answer questions related to salary history.
  • Develop a process for documenting when an applicant voluntarily discloses his/her salary history.
  • Train your Recruiting and Hiring Personnel
  • Develop a process for documenting the reasons for differentials in pay.

For questions on compliance with this new law or other employment and hiring requirements, please contact Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resource Training & Audit Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

New York City Bans Employer Inquiries Into Salary History

On May 4, 2017, New York City Mayor Bill DeBlasio signed a law amending the New York City Human Rights Law, barring all public and private New York City employers from asking job applicants about their prior wages and salary history.  The law will take effect on Tuesday, October 31, 2017. The new law makes it an unlawful, discriminatory practice for an employer to inquire about or rely upon the salary history of a job applicant to determine their salary amount during the hiring process.

The salary inquiry law bans New York City employers from:

  • Making an inquiry, either verbally or in writing, to an applicant and/or the applicant’s current or prior employer, to obtain the applicant’s salary history;
  • Searching public records for an applicant’s salary history; and/or
  • Relying on a job applicant’s salary history when making an offer of employment or extending an employment contract to the applicant.

Salary history is broadly defined in the bill as the applicant’s “current or prior wage, benefits or other compensation.”  However, salary history inquiries do not include inquiries into the objective measure of the applicant’s productivity, for example, through inquiries on revenue, sales, or production reports.  Further, employers may still discuss the applicant’s salary and benefits expectations, including the amount of unvested equity and deferred compensation an applicant would forfeit through resignation from his or her current employment.

The law contains several other exceptions to the prohibition on salary inquiries, which include the following:

  • Employers can consider and verify an applicant’s salary history if the applicant discloses the information voluntarily and without prompting;
  • Where federal, state, or local law specifically authorizes the disclosure or verification of salary history;
  • Where salary is determined by procedures in a collective bargaining agreement;
  • When current employees are transferred or promoted within the company; and
  • When a background check for non-salary related information inadvertently discloses salary history, provided the employer does not rely on that information in making an offer of employment.

The New York City’s Commission on Human Rights (NYCCHR) will be responsible for investigating complaints and enforcing the new law.  The NYCCHR will also have the authority to impose fines ranging from up to $125 for intentional violations and up to $250,000 for intentional malicious violations.

New York City employers must start to update their employment applications and train their recruiters and human resources personnel on the new requirements to ensure compliance by the October 31, 2017 deadline.  Employers may also be forced to limit the scope of their background checks and revise their notices under the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

For questions on this new law, background check laws, or other employment and hiring requirements, please contact Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resource Training & Audit Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com, or 973-533-0777.

New York Issues Regulations Implementing its Trailblazing Paid Family Leave Law

Last year, the New York State Legislature passed the country’s most wide-ranging paid family leave law, providing employees with wage replacement during time away from their job in order to bond with a child, care for a close relative with a serious health condition, or to help relieve family pressures when someone is called to active military service, commencing on January 1, 2018.  On February 22, 2017, New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced the filing of official regulations implementing New York’s Paid Family Leave Law.  The regulations provide important guidance to both employers and insurance carriers.

Covered Employers – Unlike the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), which applies only to businesses with 50 or more employees, the New York paid family leave program is required for all private employers in New York.  Public employers may opt in.

Eligible Employees – Employees become eligible for paid family leave after working full-time for their employer for 26 weeks or part-time for 175 days.

Phase-In Schedule – Unlike the FMLA, which provides 12 weeks of unpaid leave to take care of one’s family member or oneself, New York’s family leave law provides paid leave.  The program starts on January 1, 2018 and will fully phase in over the course of 4 years.  For the first year of the program, employees will be entitled to 8 weeks of family leave and 50% of their average weekly wages.  Starting January 1, 2019, employees will be entitled to 10 weeks and 55% of their average weekly wages.  On January 1, 2020, employees will still only be entitled to 10 weeks, but will be afforded 60% of their average weekly wages.  Finally, starting January 1, 2021, employees will be entitled to 12 weeks and 67% of their average weekly wages.

Qualifying Reasons – Paid family leave will be available to eligible employees to care for a new child (including newly adopted and foster children) or a close relative with a serious health condition, or to relieve family pressures created when a family member is called to active military service.  This leave is not available, however, to care for an employee’s own serious health condition, which is available under the FMLA.

Required Documentation – Employees will be required to present certain documentation to justify requests for family leave.  Documentation may include a certification from a doctor treating an employee’s family member.  New parents will also need to present birth certificates, adoption papers, or foster placement letters.  Employees wishing to address military family needs must provide military duty papers.

Reemployment – Upon return to work, employees will be entitled to resume the same or a comparable job.  The paid family leave law also provides for a continuation of health care benefits while on leave.

Employers’ “To Do” List – There are several steps businesses must take now to ensure compliance with New York’s paid family leave law.  Employers must either purchase a paid family leave insurance policy or self-insure.  The program will be fully funded by employees’ payment of premiums through payroll deductions, which employers can begin taking in July of 2017 (for coverage beginning on January 1, 2018).  In addition, employers and/or carriers must adopt a method for employees to request paid family leave, either by using the official “Request for Paid Family Leave” form (currently form PFL-1) or another method that solicits the same information as that form.  Employers must also inform all employees in writing of their rights and obligations under the new law, and eligibility information must also be included in an Employee Handbook.  Governor Cuomo has also launched a new helpline (844) 337-6303 to answer questions and provide New Yorkers with more information about the new program.

For questions about New York State’s new paid family leave law, how it interacts with the FMLA, and how to develop a compliant paid family leave policy, please contact Dina M. Mastellone, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Human Resources Practice Group, at dmastellone@nullgenovaburns.com or 973-533-0777.  Please visit our free Labor & Employment Blog at www.labor-law-blog.com to stay up-to-date on the latest news and legal developments affecting your workforce.